HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
   
 
  Blume in Love Romance Is DeadBuy this film here.
Year: 1973
Director: Paul Mazursky
Stars: George Segal, Susan Anspach, Kris Kristofferson, Marsha Mason, Shelley Winters, Donald F. Muhich, Paul Mazursky, Erin O'Reilly, Annazette Chase, Shelley Morrison, Mary Jackson, Ed Peck, Jo Morrow, Gigi Ballista, Ian Linhart, Mario Demo
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Stephen Blume (George Segal) is in love with his wife, Nina (Susan Anspach), but the trouble is she's not his wife anymore. He has arrived in Venice for a break and to recall his six-year marriage since this was the place they went on honeymoon; it became the most romantic city in the world for them, somewhere to go to recharge the batteries of their relationship and now he is here without her, Blume feels like half of a man. Nevertheless, he has his memories and as he wanders the streets and squares he observes the other tourists for whom the location is ideal to dispense with their inhibitions and throw themselves on the altar of romance. Yet his memories keep returning, all those things he did right by Nina, and all those things he did wrong...

Among the auteurs out of Hollywood in the seventies American New Wave, Paul Mazursky got a raw deal since his brand of personal, some would say too personal, dramas and comedies did not so much go out of fashion as be overtaken by the independent cinema movement, only usually they could not afford the help of a major studio to assist with the budget, so no trips to Venice for them. This placed Mazursky in a privileged position in this decade, but one which became a liability once the eighties dawned with only really Enemies: A Love Story garnering any kind of wide critical acclaim, and even then it was relegated to the smaller theatres for its distribution in spite of a fairly high profile cast.

So perhaps it would be best to remember the director as he was in his most creatively fertile era, which would be from his debut at the helm of Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice at the end of the sixties, to his last big hit An Unmarried Woman at the end of the seventies - Moscow on the Hudson did well enough as a Robin Williams vehicle, but was no blockbuster. However, the accusations against the filmmaker that he was hopelessly self-indulgent never left him, as he knew what interested him and that was by and large his own experiences, though there were reasons why you hoped Blume in Love did not follow his own life story too closely. Segal was well into his brand of middle aged crazy roles by this point, and the part of Blume could have been written specifically to his strengths.

Indeed, we are so used to Segal playing a nice guy that there's a lot increasingly jarring about the character he essayed here. Initially you want to see him as a bruised romantic, visiting Venice one last time to mull over his mistakes, and that would suit the star's persona to a tee, except that we see his first mistake was to bed his secretary (Annazette Chase) on a whim a few years into his marriage, which he might have gotten away with except he and Nina were suffering bad colds and she too had returned home to recuperate, thereby walking in on the illicit couple and seeing no way out other than divorce. What makes this ironic, or apt depending on your point of view, is that Blume is a successful Los Angeles divorce lawyer, and client Shelley Winters' opinion of the opposite sex - a disgusted spit at the mere mention of men - appears to appeal to Mazursky.

An uncomfortable way of seeing it is that Blume was intended to be more sympathetic to Mazursky's way of thinking than he ended up to those of us in the audience once the soon to be ex-husband quickly realises the error of his actions and spends the rest of the story behaving like a stalker, in the modern parlance. There's nothing sweet about Blume obsessing over Nina, only we were under the impression this was supposed to be a comedy, and the laughs are decidedly not arriving. No matter how well-observed the protagonist is he remains oddly repulsive, and Segal does wonders in conjuring a three-dimensional personality where he could easily have turned caricature what with visiting a swinger's bar or constantly making his new girlfriend (Marsha Mason, again a strong performance) feel like a second class citizen thanks to his pining. Kris Kristofferson put in a good account of himself as Nina's new stoner, musician boyfriend, but the whole movie is dominated by one horrendous act in the latter stages that makes it hard to enjoy. She'd be better off without Blume. Music by Bill Conti.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1254 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: