HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
Astronaut
Peanut Butter Falcon, The
   
 
Newest Articles
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
   
 
  Battlestar Galactica Sigh Lorne - It's The Cylons
Year: 1978
Director: Richard A. Colla, Alan J. Levi
Stars: Richard Hatch, Dirk Benedict, Lorne Greene, Herbert Jefferson Jr, Maren Jensen, Tony Swartz, Noah Hathaway, Terry Carter, Lew Ayres, Wilfrid Hyde-White, John Colicos, Laurette Spang, John Fink, Jane Seymour, Ray Milland, Ed Begley Jr, Rick Springfield
Genre: Action, Science Fiction, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: It appears the Council of Twelve have finally reached a truce with the Cylon Empire, and the President of the Twelve Colonies (Lew Ayres) is most persuasive when he says to his colleagues, including Commander Adama (Lorne Greene), that he has succeeded where centuries of predecessors have failed. With liaison Gaius Baltar (John Colicos) as a go-between, the colonies are confident years of peace lie ahead, and pilots Apollo (Richard Hatch) and Starbuck (Dirk Benedict) are preparing to take it a little easier from now on, based on the starship Battlestar Galactica where they are told to head off on a general reconnaissance mission. Apollo's brother Zac (Rick Springfield) convinces him to take his place - a fateful decision.

Glen A. Larson's television series Battlestar Galactica didn't last very long, and that was down to its relatively huge cost for a primetime show of the late seventies, but there was one reason it had been commissioned, and that wasn't Larson's yearning to make a science fiction story inspired by his Mormon background. No, what really put this into production was a phenomenon called Star Wars, and while there were plenty of movies attempting to cash in, the prohibitive bill which a TV series would run up thanks to the elaborate special effects and production design necessary meant only the most confident networks put them into their schedules. Even with a can't win Star Wars on TV premise this eventually couldn't justify itself.

Star Wars creator George Lucas sued, incidentally, and Larson did have a reputation of being "inspired" by blockbuster movies (though he was hardly alone there), yet seeing as how Lucas essentially lifted his hit from the nineteen-thirties serials of his youth, it was unsurprising a settlement was reached, and all the more fitting that Larson should announce his next project after BSG to be Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. Anyway, back at this, the pilot for the '78 show had cost a pretty penny so to make some money back Universal opted to create a movie version for cinemas, which re-edited the source slightly, added a handful of scenes, and most significantly for selected theatres combined the prints with the Sensurround process, a rumbling bass effect guaranteed to loosen fillings and ceilings alike.

All good fun, but was Lucas right to think his territory was being infringed upon, or did Battlestar Galactica stand up on its own? Plenty of audiences may have flocked to see the movie incarnation at a point when all things sci-fi and spectacular were packing them in, but there was something resolutely televisual about this affair, no matter how much fun it is to watch spaceships on the biggest screen around. It wasn't the look of the project so much as the plot, which started out as an inteplanetary war and ended up with soap opera narratives for the characters to play out in hard to get interested in fashion, before the grand finale brought back the space battles we wanted to see in the first place. This sort of low stakes interplay, where everything would be back to normal next episode, just didn't translate to the big screen where you expected more.

Rather than us being expected to be invested in Starbuck's love life between radio operator Maren Jensen as Athena and a prosti- er, socialator called Cassiopeia (Laurette Spang), or Apollo romancing war widow Serina (Jane Seymour), mother to the oddly-named Boxey (Noah Hathaway), when we would prefer to watch the robotic Cylons (with their cool, back and forth red light visor - was K.I.T.T. from Larson's Knight Rider designed by them?) and discover how the goodies were going to outsmart them on a grand scale. At over two hours, what would be fine for three TV episodes dragged, particularly when we got past the initial devastation of the Cylon attack which led the ragtag band of spaceships seeking a certain planet of safety, and into mundanity with the crew of the Galactica distracted by a space casino. OK, there was that bit where the space Supremes (with four eyes and two mouths) break a wineglass with a low note, and the fact Boxey's robot "daggit" was a chimp in costume (yeek!), but you'd have to wait for the reboot craze to see it done properly. Music by Stu Phillips.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2103 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: