HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
Shock of the Future, The
Friday
High Life
High Noon
Comes a Horseman
Scandal in Paris, A
Greta
Fight, The
Pink Jungle, The
Skiptrace
Double Date
Mind of Mr. Soames, The
Long Shot
Sherlock Holmes
Amazing Grace
Monitors, The
Memory: The Origins of Alien
Mesa of Lost Women
Banana Splits Movie, The
In Fabric
Sisters Brothers, The
Aniara
Flamingo Kid, The
Queen, The
Avengers: Endgame
Vanishing Act
   
 
Newest Articles
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Conjuring, The The Power Of Mammon Compels YouBuy this film here.
Year: 2013
Director: James Wan
Stars: Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Ron Livingston, Lili Taylor, Shanley Caswell, Hayley McFarland, Joey King, Mackenzie Foy, Kyla Deaver, Shannon Kook, John Brotherton, Sterling Jerins, Marion Guyot, Morganna Bridgers, Amy Tipton
Genre: Horror
Rating:  5 (from 2 votes)
Review: In 1968, demonologist couple Ed (Patrick Wilson) and Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) Warren were investigating a haunting concerning two nurses and the doll they had invited a spirit into. The Warrens were keen to stress that most tales of haunting were merely cases of mistakes and natural circumstances falsely leading people to believe something supernatural was involved, but in this case there seemed to be something in it. The nurses had reported the doll apparently causing a room in their shared apartment to be vandalised, whereupon they threw it out, only to be awoken that night by a tremendous banging on the front door. The doll was the source and the Warrens took it away...

But there was a lot of tremendous banging in this film, one of the loudest horror films of its era which just happened to be one of the most lucrative to boot. The genre had gone through a phase which saw it try to become as extreme as possible, with gore and torture emerging as the methods moviemakers tried to scare the punters, resulting in horror becoming a pariah once again in the field of entertainment. But then a new breed of fans started making the sort of chiller they had grown up watching on television or renting on home video where the object was not to disgust but to genuinely frighten, and so at the turn of the millennium a brace of supernatural themed efforts appeared.

Works like The Blair Witch Project showed you didn't need a huge budget to be a success, and The Sixth Sense and The Others proved a spooky atmosphere was enough to get audiences talking - and paying up for more of the same. Therefore by the time The Conjuring was released directors such as James Wan were raiding those genre classics, or if not classics at least strong memories of hits, to construct the modern day equivalent; couple that to one of those periodic upswings in interest in the paranormal and this entry was perhaps the most typical of the lot. The script by Chad Hayes and Carey Hayes reproduced a supposed true life haunting, and that important word "true" was all that was necessary to freak out the fascinated viewers.

If what we were watching was a recreation of real events - Lorraine was happy to tell all who asked that this was pretty much how the actual haunting occurred in spirit if not to the letter - then that made it all the scarier, right? The most obvious cue Wan and company were taking was from one of the biggest horror successes of the seventies, The Amityville Horror which not coincidentally was the other famous case the Warrens had investigated in that decade, and their financial nous proved very savvy indeed when ticket sales went through the roof and cinemagoers were reported to be leaping out of their seats and screaming in terror, music to the production's ears. Except how far were they really believing what they were seeing, or how far were they implementing a suspension of disbelief, for much of what happened in The Conjuring was difficult to take seriously?

You could say only the investigators and the afflicted Perron family in their isolated farmhouse truly knew what happened, but surely it wasn't this bunch of strung together, hoary old clich├ęs? If accurate, the ghosts had been watching a load of vintage horror movies, although one imagines they would be contemporary back then, because there wasn't so much a plot here as a series of shock setpieces with very little emotional depth; it was like one of those TV reconstructions with the amplification turned way up. There was a theme running through this emphasising the importance of family, and how that precious family unit was under threat by the forces of darkness only a devout Christian faith could counteract, fair enough that had been the subject of many a well-regarded chiller long before this came along, yet there was something far too reactionary in all this which left you feeling as if you had just attended a fire and brimstone church sermon rather than the entertaining subversion horror could carry off so well. Leave it to the fundamentalists. Music by Joseph Bishara.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1862 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
  Derrick Smith
   

 

Last Updated: