HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Elysium I Do Want What I Have Not GotBuy this film here.
Year: 2013
Director: Neill Blomkamp
Stars: Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Sharlto Copley, Alice Braga, Diego Luna, Wagner Moura, William Fichtner, Brandon Auret, Josh Blacker, Emma Tremblay, Jose Pablo Cantillo, Maxwell Perry Cotton, Faran Tahir, Adrian Holmes, Jared Keeso, Carly Pope, Ona Grauer
Genre: Action, Science Fiction
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: The year is 2054, and Planet Earth has never been in such a rough state, with overpopulation, crime, poverty and disease rampant. But for the citizens of Elysium, life could not be better, mainly because they are far, far away from such issues in a space station orbiting the globe: the elite, those with the money and influence to keep them away from the unpleasant reality of the larger majority of the human race. They exist in the lap of luxury, not least because they have a special process, encapsulated in a machine every home has, which will eliminate illness and injury in a matter of seconds, leaving them free of the problems afflicting those down on Earth...

Writer and director Neill Blomkamp was never one to shy away from introducing social themes into his science fiction, as had been seen before in District 9, the film he made prior to this one, and in many ways Elysium was continuing that trend, practically beating the audience over the head with his concerns about the massive injustice between the haves and have-nots. You could regard this as one extended metaphor, a plea to those who can afford to help their fellow man (or woman) to do so, but not everyone was prepared to take such naked politicising of a traditional dystopian fantasy as it was intended, and the general reaction seemed to be, never mind all that, Neill, show us some exploding spaceships.

Yet if you were prepared to engage with the director's ideas, then you would find something worthwhile, at least before the conventions of action movies were brought into play. If science fiction was the arena for promoting grand notions and commentary on the world as the author saw it, then why not attend to that, and on a platform that would be seen by a great many people, the Hollywood blockbuster, packed with special effects and with a big star or two for name above the title recognition? For that reason, the scenes in the opening half hour where Blomkamp delineated the rules of the world he was working in and the parallels and exaggerations it was connected to our society in the early 21st Century were likely the strongest in the whole work.

It's just that once that business was established and he had your attention, whether you agreed with his point of view or not, no matter how busy the film became in ensuring it all tied up thematically and allegorically, you did yearn for the more simple allusions it was making before Matt Damon had to spend the remaining hour or so hitting people. He played Max, a former petty criminal in a scenario which pretty much forces citizens to break the law, who is now trying to go straight: he has a job, which makes him the object of ridicule among those in his community, mostly because that occupation sees him treated worse than the most basic robot. Speaking of which, there are androids employed to keep order as cops and officials, allowing the authorities to leave the dirty work to them as well as showing the inhuman and unyielding face of the state.

Max is puttering through this when he is assaulted by an over-zealous cop droid, an act which sends him into conflict with the powers that be up in the space station - eventually. He takes an awful long time to get there, and in the meantime he must negotiate the cityscape of the slums, much as Sharlto Copley (who appears here as a baddie) did in District 9; making matters worse is that Max has radiation poisoning after an accident at work, and now has five days to find a cure. Hmm, how about one of those health machines in Elysium? Well, obviously, yet to reach there he must jump through a succession of hoops held by the gangsters who thrive in Los Angeles and the uncaring head honchos in orbit, led by an icy and multi-accented Jodie Foster. As if that were not enough, Max's childhood sweetheart (Alice Braga), who patches him up after battling Copley, has a daughter suffering leukemia - can he save the moppet too? What do you think? If it ends much as you'd expect, at least there was food for thought here should you want it, if heavy on the stomach. Music by Ryan Amon.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1354 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: