HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
   
 
  God Forgives, I Don't When Hill met SpencerBuy this film here.
Year: 1967
Director: Giuseppe Colizzi
Stars: Terence Hill, Bud Spencer, Frank Wolff, Gina Rovere, José Manuel Martin, Luis Barboo, Joaquin Blanco, Tito Garcia, Frank Braña, Antonietta Fiorrito, Francesco Sanz
Genre: Western
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Arguably among the best titled spaghetti westerns, later quoted by Cheech Marin in Robert Rodriguez’s trailer for Machete featured in the original uncut version of Grindhouse (2007), God Forgives, I Don’t opens with a jolt worthy of a horror movie. A cheering crowd hail an incoming train only to discover the passengers have all been gruesomely slaughtered. The sole survivor informs brawny insurance investigator Hutch Bessy (Bud Spencer) that the man behind the train robbery was infamous outlaw Bill San Antonio (Frank Wolff). Problem is, everyone knows Bill was shot dead in a duel by a gunfighter called Cat Stevens (Terence Hill). No, not the singer and activist later known as Yusuf Islam. When Cat learns his old enemy might still be alive, he sets out to uncover the truth but instead falls into a trap. After Hutch saves his life, the two formidable gunslingers team up to retrieve the stolen money and wipe out Bill’s bandit gang.

God Forgives, I Don’t marked the very first time Terence Hill (a.k.a. Mario Girotti) and Bud Spencer (a.k.a. Carlo Pedersolli) were paired together in a movie. Producer turned writer-director Giuseppe Colizzi can take credit for that although while onetime swimming champion Pedersolli was his first choice for the role of Hutch, Girotti was actually a replacement for Peter Martell. The popular Euro action star supposedly broke his leg during a domestic row with his wife after she found out he was sleeping with a makeup artist on his last movie! By such quirks of fate are movie stars made. Nevertheless while Hill and Spencer went on to make their mark with the divisive comedy western They Call Me Trinity (1970) and became undoubtedly Italy’s most enduring action-comedy team, fans might be surprised to find their inaugural outing is a lot more stark, sinister and sadistic in tone than their subsequent jovial fare. Adding to the ominous tone, the powerful score by Carlo Rustichelli sounds like it belongs in an Italian rip-off of The Omen (1976).

Colizzi, an associate of Sergio Leone, who spent time on the set of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), draws heavily from the Dollars trilogy with a flashback riddled story structure, would-be operatic violence and a climactic three-way showdown over treasure buried in an unknown grave. In fact the film was originally called Il Gatto, Il Cane e la Volpe (The Cat, the Dog and the Fox) which is how Cat Stevens ended up with that name. For the record various alternate dubs re-christened the hero as Doc Will, Wild Doc, Pretty Face (more on that later), and, inevitably, Django. Meanwhile Bud’s character was known alternately as Dan Bus and Earp Hargitay. Colizzi’s direction is assured and the handsome photography by Alfio Contini soaks up some impressive scenery but the plot proves far from coherent, a jumble of multiple flashbacks, surreal asides and sudden death that betray extensive rewrites. It is low on action, high on macho posturing with a jarring level of misogyny. A lot of women get punched, slapped and kicked around for no clear reason. Both heroes also endure their share of sadistic torture: Hill gets dunked down a well and Spencer is burned with a flaming hot poker. Speaking of flaming: Frank Wolff, memorable in only a brief role in Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), is ridiculously camp as the chatty ginger haired villain who calls Cat “pretty face” and vents his sadomasochistic impulses by tying and whipping his men. He also never shuts up.

Although hard to follow the plot does add up leaving this the one Hill/Spencer movie favoured by so-called serious spaghetti western fans who often blame the duo for the downfall of their beloved genre. Critics at the time tagged Hill a pallid imitator of Clint Eastwood. He undoubtedly imitates some of Clint’s mannerisms, presumably under Colizzi’s instruction, but brings his own distinctive athletic vigour to such action sequences as when Cat beats up some villains whilst suspended from a rope. Meanwhile, good old reliable Bud Spencer was even at this early stage conforming to the burly, monosyllabic unbeatable fighting machine that became his stock character. Adding to the confusion his character disappears and reappears throughout the tangled narrative, materialising like a genie whenever some ass-kicking is required. Colizzi made two sequels that though disdained by spaghetti western purists for their more light-hearted tone are actually superior, adding a memorably lively Eli Wallach to the mix in Aces High (1968) before bowing out with Boot Hill (1969).

Click here for the German language trailer

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 2064 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: