HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
   
 
Newest Articles
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
   
 
  Wishmaster Lamp Him OneBuy this film here.
Year: 1997
Director: Robert Kurtzman
Stars: Tammy Lauren, Andrew Divoff, Robert Englund, Chris Lemmon, Wendy Benson, Tony Crane, Jenny O'Hara, Kane Hodder, Tony Todd, Rico Ross, John Byner, George 'Buck' Flower, Gretchen Palmer, Ted Raimi, Angus Scrimm, Reggie Bannister, Joseph Pilato, Verne Troyer
Genre: Horror
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Many centuries ago, tales were told of the Djinn, a demon spirit which could grant any wish it was asked; however, there was always a twist to this as the spirit was power hungry, and should he be able to grant three wishes to one individual he would be able to bring about Hell on Earth as he would see fit. Nobody has allowed him this so far, but he came close once in the Middle East where he tricked a king into letting him unleash his might: fortunately there was a wise man who stopped the Djinn (Andrew Divoff) just before mankind was doomed...

Ah, but there will be other chances, because just as the template of eighties horror influenced many a franchise where an entry could be produced cheaply without need for innovation, so it was Wishmaster spawned a bunch of sequels. Generally, it was recommended you stick with the first one if they sounded appealling, otherwise you were wasting your time with filler material: for the point where horror sequels were getting to, quite often they would be strictly for the straight to video market, and it was a fact that many were surprised this initial instalment was released to cinemas at all, but it was, which at least raised some kind of profile.

It was the brainchild of Peter Atkins, the man who was no stranger to shocker sequelising when he had penned a number of Hellraiser efforts, his Hellbound: Hellraiser II being by far the best of them. At the time Wishmaster appeared on the scene, there was not a majority standing up for it, probably thanks to this looking very old hat when it was the summer of Wes Craven's Scream, which revitalised the chiller market. This on the other hand, even though it had Craven's name "presenting" it, was so obviously a throwback to the previous decade's productions that no matter how much novelty Atkins put into it, we'd really seen it all before.

So Wishmaster was rather unloved, seeming a bit silly when it had apparently been inspired by Disney's Aladdin as much as it had Craven's Freddy Krueger series, caught between the two stools of the horror of the recent past and the horror of the twenty-first century. All this makes it interesting to look back on now and realise, for all the criticism it received, hey, maybe it wasn't all that bad. Certainly it was no classic, but never underestimate nostalgia, and this came across as nostalgic itself for the slashers with the novelty kills that proliferated in the years before it, which renders it a shade more generously regarded now all that time has gone by since its release. Yes, it still looked a bit cheap and nasty, but in a kitschy fashion.

One aspect which saw it pay tribute to those peers and antecedents was the cast of horror regulars. The Linda Hamilton-esque Tammy Lauren was our heroine, who examines the jewel containing the Djinn and from then on has an unexplained connection with it, meaning she is the one who must wish three times for him to get his own wish come true. You do wonder why the throaty-voiced Djinn didn't just get the first person he met to make three wishes, but no, he is intent on messing things up for himself so every time they voice their first desire, he kills them in a twisted version of that desire, or at least captures their souls as they turn into glass doors, mannequins or escapologists (?!), usually played by some familiar face from another franchise. That Wishmaster goes about this with a trashy verve was not something noted back in '97 when it was deemed needlessly sadistic, but it comes across as a lot tamer now, and an excuse for director Robert Kurtzman to exercise his special effects expertise. It remains nothing great, but it didn't have to be. Music by Harry Manfredini.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 988 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: