HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Bruce Lee & I
Doraemon The Movie: Nobita's Dinosaur
Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood
Invasion Planet Earth
Ferdinand
Buddhist Spell, The
Steel and Lace
Reivers, The
Angel Has Fallen
I Lost My Body
At First Light
Free Ride
Crawl
Transit
Blank Check
Mad Monk, The
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
   
 
Newest Articles
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
   
 
  Abbott and Costello Meet Captain Kidd Who Do They Think They Arrr?Buy this film here.
Year: 1952
Director: Charles Lamont
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Charles Laughton, Hillary Brooke, Bill Shirley, Leif Erickson, Fran Warren, Harry Wilson
Genre: Musical, Comedy
Rating:  5 (from 2 votes)
Review: The pirate ship of Captain Kidd (Charles Laughton) is docked at this port, which can only mean one thing: mayhem. The buccaneers run riot there, fighting, carousing and drinking as much alcohol as they can get their hands on, but for two servants in the local tavern, Rocky Stonebridge (Bud Abbott) and Puddin' Head Feathergill (Lou Costello) it's a time to avoid danger. This proves difficult, but in the midst of the pandemonium they are requested by Lady Jane (Fran Warren) to deliver a letter to her sweetheart Bruce (Bill Shirley): just typical of them to get it mixed up with the treasure map of Captain Kidd (Charles Laughton)...

For much of their careers, Abbott and Costello would be under contract with Universal, but every so often they would go off and make a film independently for their own reasons. The reason for this pirate spoof was down to their wish to make films in colour, but Universal saw them making enough profits for them in black and white so were reluctant to indulge them. Therefore the odd movie like this or their version of Jack and the Beanstalk was created under their personal production companies, in colour photography that may have been cheap but wasn't actually all that good, though this time around they were able to secure the services of a proper star.

Mr Laughton being that star, apparently here in the hope he could let his hair down and show audiences he could play comedy as well as he could play drama. In this case that backfired when the consensus was that he had embarrassed himself by appearing alongside these two comedians, taking part in their routines and even their slapstick, which can't have done his famously uncertain self-esteem too much benefit. Nevertheless, for fans of the boys, seeing them performing alongside a thespian of Laughton's calibre, even if he was often accused of being a ham, contained quite some degree of novelty and has sustained interest in what was really a fairly disposable entry in their careers.

It was a musical too, though the songs were not exactly what you'd imagine the average Abbott and Costello fan would be keen to listen to, nor for that matter what the average pirate would either as Warren and Shirley regaled us with operetta-style trilling which interrupted the flow of the comedy, such as it was. The love interest here was even less interesting than it usually might have been, not the fault of the actors but of a script that plainly wasn't taken with them, which left the main point of attraction witnessing the interplay between the lead trio of stars as Laughton blustered his way through scenes chiefly bothering him with the mix up with the treasure map, which was laborious to say the least.

The best way to describe the plot was chaotic as it was essentially an excuse to string the routines together, some of which were better than others. The writers Howard Dimsdale and John Grant knew what would suit the comics best, but by this stage innovation was never going to be on the agenda, so variations on their seasoned vaudeville business was the order of the day, though with a lot less of the verbal sparring they were so good at, with most of the laughs (or so they hoped) coming from such business as Lou getting a faceful of seawater when he opens a window when Bud does not, or Laughton repeatedly knocked out with a shovel for the denouement. He was evidently enjoying himself, thus proving the maxim that what serious actors yearn to do is make people laugh like their favourite comedians did, though whether he achieved that was a moot point. Mainly this was silly fluff which showed nobody at their best, but was not the disaster some would have judged it. Music by Raoul Kraushaar.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2227 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: