HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Informers, The Let's Be Avin' Yew
Year: 1963
Director: Ken Annakin
Stars: Nigel Patrick, Margaret Whiting, Katherine Woodville, Colin Blakely, Derren Nesbitt, Harry Andrews, Michael Coles, John Cowley, Allan Cuthbertson, Frank Finlay, Ronald Hines, Roy Kinnear, Peter Prowse, George Sewell, Kenneth J. Warren, Brian Wilde
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Down at the station, the detectives have been told by their Superintendent, Bestwick (Harry Andrews), that he is sick of hearing about them using informers from the criminal underworld to get their information, so from now on they are banned from using them in investigations. This is bad news for Chief Inspector Johnnoe (Nigel Patrick) as this was his main method of breaking his cases, especially the rash of bank robberies which have broken out across his patch of London in recent weeks. But instead of giving up the practice, he decides to be a lot quieter about it...

The ever-urbane and debonnaire Nigel Patrick was few people's idea of a British Charles Bronson, but he had a damn good try at it in The Informers, on the surface an identikit crime flick from the period where such things were feeling the pinch from television. What Dixon of Dock Green and its ilk could not supply was violence, so it was evidently the main purpose of bringing this tale (based on Douglas Warner's book Death of a Snout) to have this a far grittier prospect for cinemagoers than what they could see at home - on the box, that was. As Z-Cars began to grow in popularity, this sort of thriller had to keep up with the Joneses of TV to offer a reason for its audience to leave the house.

If anything, The Informers looked a lot more like the type of cop drama which arrived in the nineteen-seventies: if you were reminded of The Sweeney while watching this, then that was little wonder as its landscape of tough policemen and grubby criminals mixing with the bigger fishes in small ponds was very much taken from cinema of this previous decade. It may not start very promisingly, looking like some staid morality play about whether the law should be more judicious about where they get their information, never mind whether those in the know should pass that information on, but stick with it and you'll be pleasantly surprised at its increasingly seamy atmosphere and genuine suspense.

Patrick's Johnnoe is not exactly a bent copper, but he is willing to bend the rules if it suits his pursuit of justice, so willingly encourages his informer, or "snout" in the parlance of the day, to hang around where he might be able to shine a little light on those bank robberies. So when Jim Ruskin (John Cowley) is found dead, run over with a car out in the middle of the Essex countryside, Johnnoe smells a rat, and rightly so as we know the gangster behind the bank jobs is the same as the one who executed Jim to keep him quiet. Jim had a brother, Charlie (Colin Blakely), who bears an understandable grudge against the inspector for getting his sibling in over his head, but can he be relied upon to help Johnnoe when the gangster, Bertie Hoyle (Derren Nesbitt), frames him?

The cast was packed with recognisable faces, a host of character actors all clearly relishing the chance to play tough guys, even the likes of Roy Kinnear and Brian Wilde (best known for sitcom Last of the Summer Wine). Nesbitt was by this stage in his career a regular heavy in his movies, and none the less effective for that, a nasty little wideboy who is backed up by his right hand man Leon Sale (Frank Finlay) as the real power behind the throne, such as it is. With a complex but easy to follow storyline which gives every actor their opportunity to put in good work, handy when our main character ends up behind bars and cannot contribute to the proceedings until he's bailed, the sense of an ensemble of professionals only enhanced the growing tension. Climaxing with a massive "punch-up", what has led up to it was well-handled by director Ken Annakin, and if it's true you'd get as much enjoyment from watching an episode of Regan and Carter's exploits, that was no bad thing, was it? Music by Clifton Parker.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2417 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: