HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Elstree 1976
High and the Mighty, The
Ethel & Ernest
Seventh Seal, The
I.T.
FM
Gladiator
Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon
Eyewitness
Memories of Underdevelopment
In Search of the Exile
I Am Not a Serial Killer
Ruggles of Red Gap
I, Daniel Blake
Army of One
Romance With a Double Bass
We Go On
Baby Face
Girls Lost
Deep Impact
Train to Busan
Nerve
Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
Crying Game, The
Dragon Lord
Star is Born, A
Surviving the Game
Passion of Joan of Arc, The
Hunted, The
Adam and Eve Meet the Cannibals
   
 
Newest Articles
Face the Strange: Extremes of British Pop Movies '65-'75
How To Become The Most Famous Man in the World: Chaplin at Essanay on Blu-ray
Every Day's a Holiday, Charlie Brown!
Christmas Bonus: All Star Comedy Carnival on DVD
Manor On Movies: Beat On The Brat(s)
The SHADO Knows: UFO The Complete Series on Blu-ray
Siege Mentality: Rio Bravo and Assault on Precinct 13
Queens of Women: Five Cult Stars, Five Cult Films
Abstract Strategies: The Brothers Quay on Blu-ray
Born to be Cad: George Sanders and Psychomania
   
 
  Grotesque Beyond beliefBuy this film here.
Year: 1988
Director: Joe Tornatore
Stars: Linda Blair, Tab Hunter, Donna Wilkes, Brad Wilson, Nels Van Patten, Sharon Hughes, Michelle Bensoussan, Guy Stockwell, Charles Dierkop, Chuck Morrell, Lincoln Tate, Luana Patten, Robert Z'Dar, Billy Frank, Bunki Z
Genre: Horror, Trash, Weirdo
Rating:  4 (from 2 votes)
Review: Quite possibly the strangest horror movie of the Eighties, and not to be confused with the tawdry Japanese torture porn of the same name, Grotesque opens with a cod-Edgar Allan Poe tale of an old woman (Luana Patten) stalked by a cloaked monster in a haunted house. This turns out to be a film-within-a-film project by elderly special effects artist Orville Kruger (Guy Stockwell). Having wrapped his latest movie, Orville heads for a weekend at his cabin in the woods along with daughter Lisa (Linda Blair) and her best friend Kathy (Donna Wilkes). En route the girls find themselves menaced by a gang of cackling, sub-human punks led by snarling moron Scratch (Brad Wilson). Suspecting old Orville has a hidden fortune stashed somewhere, the gang invade his house and slaughter everyone save Lisa, observed by the Kruger family’s dark secret: a hideously deformed mutant hidden in a secret room! As Lisa flees across the snowy wastes with the punks in hot pursuit, the monster picks them off one by one. But this is only the beginning...

Grotesque would be notable enough as a bizarre attempt to crossbreed a home invasion thriller with the slasher genre, redneck vigilante thriller, biker movie and monster-on-the-loose romp, but the film springs an array of deranged, mind-bending twists before concluding with a campy post-modern wink aimed at fans of classic horror more befitting a Mel Brooks spoof than a seemingly “serious” horror film. Make no mistake, once seen this film is not easily forgotten, no matter how hard you might try. Co-produced by Linda Blair, who took her name off the credits once she saw the finished film, this pairs The Exorcist star with Donna Wilkes, star of Eighties exploitation favourite Angel (1984) but surprisingly dispenses with both ostensible leads early on.

Midway through, Lisa’s uncle Rod enters the fray played by former teen heart-throb turned cult film stalwart Tab Hunter, joining a posse in the hope of rescuing his niece. Thereafter the third act finds Lisa comatose while the surviving “punkers” (as the script insists on calling them) are interrogated by idiotic policemen whose good cop/bad cop routine is stupefying beyond belief and who shrug their shoulders when Rod openly admits he is planning to go Charles Bronson on their punk asses. Whereupon the twist-laden climax drags the film into another country of madness altogether. Proving even terrible movies can harbour an ambitious agenda, this delivers a faintly satirical assessment of the horror genre circa the late Eighties alongside a discussion on the nature of reality versus illusion encapsulated in prankster poppa Orville’s propensity for scaring friends and family with frankly shoddy monster masks.

Based on a story conceived by Joe Tornatore, a prolific actor on film and television whose credits include the similarly twist-laden action film The Zebra Force (1976) along with more recent, if equally inept horrors Demon Keeper (1994) and Immortally Yours (2009), the film was scripted by seventy-one year old actor/writer Mikel Angel whose past credits include the blaxploitation films The Black Six (1973), The Candy Tangerine Man (1975) and Lady Cocoa (1975) and his lone writer-director gig on The Love Butcher (1975). While the script has some potentially interesting ideas, the film is sorely let down by directorial incompetence and horrifically embarrassing performances from the supporting cast of punk-styled villains, with talentless Brad Wilson the worst offender. Like some foul-mouthed, ultra-violent episode of Scooby-Doo, Grotesque is often hilariously inept and every bit as cartoonish as the old Hanna-Barbera cartoon, although its surprise multiple endings almost redeem the entire enterprise.

Click here for the trailer

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 1030 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme music?
Superman: The Movie
The Dark Knight
The Taking of Pelham One Two Three ('74)
Star Wars
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
The Great Escape
Halloween
The Ipcress File
The Magnificent Seven
Back to the Future
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Shrimpton
Enoch Sneed
Guild Lee
  Desbris M
Joshua Dudley
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
   

 

Last Updated: