HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
February
Taking of Beverly Hills, The
Marjorie Prime
Hotel Salvation
Mangler, The
Shiraz
Mercy, The
Kickboxer: Retaliation
Molly Maguires, The
Party, The
Dante's Peak
Housemaid, The
Vendetta
Brimstone
Boys in the Trees
Once Were Warriors
Red Planet Mars
Blade Runner 2049
Devil's Express
Belko Experiment, The
Flashback
War of the Arrows
One-Trick Pony
Cloverfield Paradox, The
Beach Rats
In Between
Flesh Feast
Gerald's Game
Crocodile Dundee II
Baaghi
   
 
Newest Articles
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
Apocalypse 80s UK: Threads and When the Wind Blows
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
   
 
  Trap, The Love In A Cold ClimateBuy this film here.
Year: 1966
Director: Sidney Hayers
Stars: Rita Tushingham, Oliver Reed, Rex Sevenoaks, Barbara Chilcott, Linda Goranson, Blain Fairman, Walter Marsh, Joseph Golland, Jon Granik, Merv Campone, Reg McReynolds
Genre: Romance, Adventure
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Ten years ago young Eve (Rita Tushingham) was struck dumb when she witnessed the violent death of her family at the hands of Canadian Indians, and she has spoken nary a word since. After she escaped the fate of her loved ones, she was adopted by a trader (Rex Sevenoaks) and his wife (Barbara Chilcott), but now she is grown she begins to wonder what her place is in the world. When the steamboat arrives with supplies at the isolated river town, she notes the fallen women being auctioned off to the trappers and worries...

Not to worry, Eve, here comes Oliver Reed to shine a ray of sunlight into your life, although you might not be entirely pleased to see him in the beginning. This may have started out as an adventure yarn, but there's a romantic aspect to The Trap which looked to be aimed at the sort of girl who played hard to get but actually wanted some big, strong brute to gather her up in his arms and get in touch with his sensitive side, all thanks to her benevolent influence, naturally. Tushingham, who keeps looking to be about to speak but doesn't quite, put in a sterling performance in the face of a rampant Reed and managed to make something out of a dubious cliché.

Not that Ollie is terrible, far from it as this most physical actor was in his element as the mountain man who wants a companion to stave off the loneliness he cannot quite bring himself to admit he feels, it's just that his Candian accent wasn't the best, and tended to work against his overall reading of the character. What British viewers would be most distracted by, on the other hand, was Ron Goodwin's music, for the main theme was the same one as used by the BBC for the coverage of the London Marathon - even more alarming was that it had lyrics here, sung by Reed, as if it were some traditional folk song.

"When I'm a man, I'll take me a wife!", "And she shall have diamonds and pearls!", that sort of thing, it sounds authentic unless you have an image in your head of someone dressed as a gorilla huffing and puffing around the streets of the British capital for charity. Anyway, put that to the back of your minds and concentrate on the plot, which was not too bad as these things went. Once Eve has been sold off to Reed's La Bete (meaning The Beast, a fairy tale allusion that just about holds water), much against her wishes, he takes her in his canoe to his log cabin in the wilderness where she spends her time glaring wordlessly at him and pondering how she'll ever get back to some approximation of civilisation.

La Bete makes his living catching and skinning animals for their fur, but after a fashion teaches Eve to hunt for creatures they can eat, and she begins to predictably warm to him without showing much overt affection, smiling demurely at his jokes and seeing the vulnerability underneath that rough exterior, which becomes all the more apparent thanks to a late on twist when he gets careless one day and catches his ankle in one of his own traps. Could that be the trap of the title, or does it refer to the situation Eve has found herself in, or does it more sweepingly indicate the crazy little thing called love? That's up to you, the viewer to decide, but for a rugged outdoors yarn blessed with a woman's touch this was perfectly decent, and Reed and Tushingham made an intriguing couple; set against this striking landscape and you had a film good to look at, if not perhaps as much to listen to, and the sexual politics were more complex than hinted at first glance with Eve stubbornly fighting to retain her identity in harsh surroundings.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1729 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Jason Cook
  Andrew Irvine
Ian Phillips
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: