HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Apartment 1BR
1776
Parasite
Looking On the Bright Side
Take Me Somewhere Nice
Simon
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  St. Ives The Go-Between
Year: 1976
Director: J. Lee Thompson
Stars: Charles Bronson, John Houseman, Jacqueline Bisset, Maximilian Schell, Harry Guardino, Harris Yulin, Dana Elcar, Michael Lerner, George Memmoli, Dick O'Neill, Elisha Cook Jr, Jerome Thor, Burr DeBenning, Daniel J. Travanti, Jeff Goldblum, Robert Englund
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Raymond St. Ives (Charles Bronson) is lying in bed in the cheap hotel room where he stays, even at this late hour in the day, when his agent (Michael Lerner) opens the door and encourages him to get up and face life. He has a job for him seeing as how St. Ives has retired from his previous employment as a police reporter to write a book, a plan that has not borne much fruit. It's simple enough: act as a go-between for wealthy eccentric Prokane (John Houseman) who has seen his secret plans for a robbery stolen. But how simple is it really?

After Harper was a hit back in the mid-sixties, the major Hollywood movie stars lined up to step into Paul Newman's shoes, and in that way Humphrey Bogart's shoes to pay a further tribute, and appear in their own efforts as private detectives. St. Ives was not strictly a private dick, yet he certainly acted like one for the whole of this story even though he was at pains to stay on the periphery of the unfolding mystery, and indeed until the end where everything is wrapped up our hero hardly needed to be present at all. But we had to have someone provide an entry point for the plot, and he was it.

Those used to seeing Bronson in two-fisted roles might be shortchanged here, as for the most part he could almost be sipping martinis with one elbow resting on the mantlepiece, which he would sometimes joke about trying as a change of pace from his usual thrillers. There are a couple of action sequences, with the star performing his own stunts including a striking fall down a lift shaft thanks to Jeff Goldblum and Robert Englund ganging up on him (rest assured, they pay for their hubris), but for the most part Stives was a curiously mellow role where he would largely stand back and allow the others to get on with the doublecrossing and so forth.

Actually, with its flat, television movie look and lack of any real violence or bad language, what this most resembled was a feature length episode of one of those detective series so beloved of television audiences of the decade. If you ever wanted to see what The Rockford Files would have been like with Bronson in the lead, then here was your chance, although Stives was on the receiving end of being knocked out far fewer times than James Garner ever was - remember who we're dealing with, after all. As you might have gathered, this rendered the yarn less cinematic than it might have been, but if you did like vintage TV shows then this would be the Bronson vehicle for you.

Adding to the bonus of a decent story fairly well told, if nothing special, was the cast, mainly made up of Hollywood veterans more than capable of breathing life into some undeniably two-dimensional roles. In the first scene alone Michael Lerner was interacting with Elisha Cook Jr, and sticking with it would see the likes of Houseman (sporting dyed red hair, oddly), Maximilian Schell as a psychiatrist, Harris Yulin as a cop, and many more familiar faces even if you couldn't immediately bring their names to mind. There was but one main female character, however, and she was Prokane's companion Janet Whistler, played by Jacqueline Bisset, but making up for the fact the rest of the cast were a bunch of blokes few would describe as eye candy. All this lot make things difficult for Stives, but Bronson was a lot more charming than his accustomed image often allowed, a good enough reason to watch what was second tier material otherwise. The music was unmistakably by Lalo Schifrin.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2538 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

J. Lee Thompson  (1914 - 2002)

Veteran British director frequently in Hollywood, usually with stories featuring an adventure or thriller slant. Among his many films, including a number of Charles Bronson movies, are Yield to the Night, Ice Cold in Alex, North West Frontier, the original Cape Fear, Tiger Bay, The Guns of Navarone, What a Way To Go!, Eye of the Devil, Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, Battle for the Planet of the Apes and Happy Birthday to Me.

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: