HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Birth of the Dragon
Revenge of the Pink Panther
Thelma
Stratton
February
Taking of Beverly Hills, The
Marjorie Prime
Hotel Salvation
Mangler, The
Shiraz
Mercy, The
Kickboxer: Retaliation
Molly Maguires, The
Party, The
Dante's Peak
Housemaid, The
Vendetta
Brimstone
Boys in the Trees
Once Were Warriors
Red Planet Mars
Blade Runner 2049
Devil's Express
Belko Experiment, The
Flashback
War of the Arrows
One-Trick Pony
Cloverfield Paradox, The
Beach Rats
In Between
   
 
Newest Articles
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
Apocalypse 80s UK: Threads and When the Wind Blows
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
   
 
  Other Guys, The The Flaw In The LawBuy this film here.
Year: 2010
Director: Adam McKay
Stars: Will Ferrell, Mark Wahlberg, Eva Mendes, Michael Keaton, Steve Coogan, Rob Riggle, Damon Wayans Jr, Ray Stevenson, Samuel L. Jackson, Dwayne Johnson, Bobby Cannavale, Natalie Zea, Brett Gelman, Michael Delaney, Anne Heche, Josef Sommer, Ice-T
Genre: Comedy, Action
Rating:  8 (from 3 votes)
Review: The two best cops on the force are Highsmith (Samuel L. Jackson) and Danson (Dwayne Johnson), who always get the baddies no matter how much damage they cause or what the cost to human life is, and the citizens of New York City love them for it. They can cause car smashes, explode the front off buildings, any amount of mayhem, but if they get results then where's the harm? That's the reason why they are so lauded, and that's the reason they don't bother doing their paperwork. That kind of thing is best left to the other guys, like deskbound cops Gamble (Will Ferrell) and Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg) - and nobody takes them seriously...

Just as it was getting so that Will Ferrell was outstaying his welcome by producing the same tired old improvisation and passing it off as a story to his latest movie, along came The Other Guys to reinvigorate his standing. Working again with Adam McKay, who had provided him with his cult favourite Anchorman among others, this item had an unusual effect on many of those who saw it and were familiar with the Ferrell shtick: if you thought you enjoyed his comedies then the chances were this may well have left you cold, but if you thought you'd seen enough then you would probably find yourself laughing.

A lot, as while there was nothing much new about what they came up with here, somehow it all fitted together in its rambling, digressive manner, perhaps because for the first time a Ferrell comedy had a social conscience underneath all the foolishness. As the end credits indicated, the double dealings of big business and the major banks, a scandal very much in the news during 2010, was what offered the backdrop and in an oblique way the target of the humour, as Steve Coogan essayed the role of the supposed villain as an ineffectual British banker who nevertheless has spent a massive amount of other people's money on fraud, and is now trying to wriggle out of the consequences.

But that was not all there was in the movie's sights, as a considerably more amiable point to The Other Guys was to send up the buddy cop movie, not exactly a fresh idea, and on this evidence inspired by the artistic success of Hot Fuzz, which shared a dynamic between the two "buddies". Gamble is a mild mannered butt of the office's jokes, preferring life at his desk to life on the beat, while his partner Hoitz is a loose cannon frustrated by the situation, but effectively being punished for a professional indiscretion (he shot the wrong guy). It was nothing we hadn't seen plenty of times before, yet Ferrell and Wahlberg's dedication to straight-faced absurdity generated many big laughs.

Their chief (a TLC-quoting Michael Keaton) allows them to go back on the streets, although Gamble is reluctant, after those two major league cops who hog the opening ten minutes hit a snag stemming from their overconfidence. Before long the duo have run over the body at a crime scene and had their car covered in cocaine, then as if that was not enough, when they try to arrest Coogan's Sir David Ershon they end up losing the car, their phones and their shoes, all apparently because they were overruled by some operatives higher up the authority food chain. But they begin to latch onto the corruption going on, and if you can follow it - the near-endless distractions make it incredible that our heroes managed to get anything done whatsoever, never bothering how the audience feels - you should pick up on the anti-big business themes. In the main, though, you'll be picking up on the ridiculous humour, neat interplay, and winning non-sequiturs; if you were sympathetic, this would remind you how good these filmmakers could be when they set their minds to it. Music by John Brion.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1973 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
The Elix
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Jason Cook
  Andrew Irvine
Ian Phillips
   

 

Last Updated: