HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Set It Off
No Way Out
Traffik
Pitch Perfect 3
Insidious: The Last Key
Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick, The
Dirty Carnival, A
King of Hearts
Crowhurst
And the Same to You
Racer and the Jailbird
Superman and the Mole-Men
Phantom Thread
Sweet Country
Loophole
Irma La Douce
Brigsby Bear
Wish Upon
Gringo
Finding Vivian Maier
Shape of Water, The
Lady Bird
Endless, The
Universal Soldier: The Return
Lean on Pete
Carnival in Flanders
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
It Came from the Desert
Lodgers, The
Eagle vs Shark
   
 
Newest Articles
And It Was the Dirtiest Harry We Have Seen in a Very Long Time: The Dirty Harry Series
Manor On Movies: The Astounding She Monster
Manor On Movies: Don't be a dolt. That's not a cult (movie)
Wes Anderson's Big Daddies: Steve Zissou and Others
Bad Taste from Outer Space: Galaxy of Terror and Xtro
A Yen for the 1990s: Iron Monkey and Satan Returns
Hey, Punk: Jubilee and Rock 'n' Roll High School
Help! with The Knack: Richard Lester in 1965
Roll Up, Get Yer Free Cinema: The Shorts on the BFI Woodfall Blu-rays
Time for Heroes: The Dam Busters and How I Won the War
Hell is a City: Midnight Cowboy and Taxi Driver
Boris Goes Bonkers, Bela Goes Bats: The Old Dark House and Mark of the Vampire
Charles Bronson's Mid-70s: Breakheart Pass and Others
Kids in America: The Breakfast Club vs Metropolitan
80s Dance-Off: Staying Alive vs Murder-Rock vs Breakin'
   
 
  Forgetting Sarah Marshall It's Not Me, It's YouBuy this film here.
Year: 2008
Director: Nicholas Stoller
Stars: Jason Segel, Kristen Bell, Mila Kunis, Russell Brand, Bill Hader, Liz Cackowski, Martha Thayer, Jack McBrayer, Taylor Wily, Da'Vone McDonald, Steve Landesberg, Jonah Hill, Paul Rudd, Kala Alexander, William Baldwin, Jason Bateman
Genre: Comedy, Romance
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Peter Bretter (Jason Segel) is a composer who makes his living creating the music for a popular crime television series, and he thinks he is happy, especially as the equally popular star of the show, Sarah Marshall (Kristen Bell), is his girlfriend. Although he's something of a slob, he is content until Sarah walks into his apartment one morning after some time away and breaks some bad news to him: she doesn't want to be in a relationship with him anymore. Peter is stunned, but knows by the look on her face she is serious, and not even a final hug will change her mind. So now what?

Forgetting Sarah Marshall was one of the comedies to emerge from the Judd Apatow stable of talent, and the first major big screen role for Segel, whose profile had risen when he was part of the ensemble of Apatow's cult TV series Freaks and Geeks. Here he was playing a similar character to the one he had there, unlucky in love, unaware of his limitations until it's too late, and interested in making music his career, although Peter had succeeded in that respect, even if he realises early on that crafting the ominous tunes for some CSI-style effort is not what he really wants to be doing with his life. It takes the absence of Sarah to wake him up.

Segel also wrote the script for this, and evidently was conjuring up something he knew would play to his strengths as a performer, even if that persona risked alienating the audience, for the first hour at least. Peter is something of a pathetic soul, and while he doesn't quite cross the line into creepy obsessive, it's a close run thing, so when he decides that a holiday in Hawaii is what he needs the not exactly surprising twist does little to endear him to us. That's right, the minute he arrives at the hotel he bumps into Sarah, who happens to be beginning her vacation at the same location - he should have guessed before he made his plans.

Also along for the ride is Sarah's new boyfriend, a louche British rock star called Aldous Snow, played by louche British comedian Russell Brand. Actually, Brand was pretty much playing himself, with music standing in for comedy as his career, and he won some decent notices for his role, mainly among those who hadn't been overexposed to his shtick which was growing overfamiliar to many people by this stage. Didn't stop him being successful, and that hold Aldous has over the other characters worked out well for the film, particularly as we're meant to be in full sympathy with the hapless Peter.

If you can get over the strong whiff of needy desperation that he carries with him, something that the receptionist at the hotel's front desk finds all too easy to do. In one of those only in the movies plot developments, or only in the movies written by the star that is, she falls for Peter by first feeling sorry for him and then getting to like his "poor me" personality, so naturally this Rachel character is essayed by the most beautiful woman in the film, Mila Kunis. Rachel has her darker side, of course, but this seems to be a sop to those who resist the customary improving female who turns up all the time in movies like this, and shouldn't detain you for long. To the story's benefit, Segel didn't make the path of true love run smooth, and what could have been a bitter trawl through his own personal breakups, as if to get his own back, is admirably able to see both sides of the argument. It's just a pity that this diverted him away from the more promising jokes. Music by Lyle Workman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1513 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Stately Wayne Manor
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Jamie Nichols
Andrew Pragasam
George White
   

 

Last Updated: