HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Lucky Seven
Snoopy and Charlie Brown: The Peanuts Movie
Anthropoid
Seeding of a Ghost
Hook, The
Murder Unincorporated
Valley of Love
Return, The
Clan of the White Lotus
Legend of Longwood, The
Chevalier
Invitation, The
Finding Dory
Collectionneuse, La
Finding Nemo
Sur, El
Crusher Joe - The Ice Prison
Good Morning
Under the Shadow
Remember
R.L. Stine's Monsterville: The Cabinet of Souls
So Sweet... So Perverse
Bastille Day
Deadly Art of Survival, The
Killer Reserved Nine Seats, The
Danger Pays
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
Checkpoint
Hunchback of Soho
Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell
   
 
Newest Articles
Every Day's a Holiday, Charlie Brown!
Christmas Bonus: All Star Comedy Carnival on DVD
Manor On Movies: Beat On The Brat(s)
The SHADO Knows: UFO The Complete Series on Blu-ray
Siege Mentality: Rio Bravo and Assault on Precinct 13
Queens of Women: Five Cult Stars, Five Cult Films
Abstract Strategies: The Brothers Quay on Blu-ray
Born to be Cad: George Sanders and Psychomania
Speed Kills: The History of Fast Zombies
Skeleton Crew: The Blind Dead Movies
   
 
  When You're Strange The DoormenBuy this film here.
Year: 2009
Director: Tom DiCillo
Stars: Johnny Depp, John Densmore, Robby Krieger, Ray Manzarek, Jim Morrison
Genre: Documentary, Music
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: After emerging from a wrecked vehicle, Jim Morrison is wandering along the desert highway trying to thumb a lift when a car stops and he climbs in. But he is also driving the car, and as he speeds down the road the radio is playing, with the newsreader announcing his death at the age of twenty-seven over the airwaves. This is a documentary which sets out to explore the band Morrison belonged to, The Doors, and not only relate the history of their journey, but place the group in context: the context of the decade they came to prominence in, and what their impact on the popular culture had been.

Director Tom DiCillo was best known for his quirky dramas and comedies before his Doors documentary was released, and afterwards... he was still known for his quirky comedies and dramas, as there were quite a few fans of this musical phenomenon who were less than impressed with what he did with all that precious footage that he had been given. It's hard to tell if When You're Strange was intended for the newcomer to the music or for the seasoned aficionado, but if there's one thing that came across it was that The Doors might as well have been called Jim Morrison and the Jim Morrison Band.

Sure, there's a few sops thrown to the other members, so we hear about John Densmore walking out of a recording session in a state of mental exhaustion, or Ray Manzarek playing on as the stage collapsed during the infamous Miami show, but the focus is on Jim throughout, as if he were not simply the key to their success, but the reason behind their downfall as well. Fair enough, when people think of The Doors the first thing that springs to mind will be Mr Mojo Rising himself, gyrating in his leather trousers while singing and howling into the microphone, but if you were hoping for something more inclusive of the other personalities in the band then you may well be disappointed.

DiCillo assembled this in a scrapbook fashion, moving from clip to clip with Johnny Depp's narration relied on to keep the story going. Of the actual music of the band, it's rare to hear one of their songs played all the way through here, as we get the most recognisable bits of their most recognisable tunes (except Hello I Love You for some reason), but mainly they're there to sustain a flow of sound and vision, meaning you could very well let this all drift before your eyes and ears without it making much of an impression. There were no contemporary interviews, although Depp paraphrases the odd comment from the chief players, but a wealth of footage from the time did at least convey a spirit of the age, of which The Doors were a major musical part.

Alas, Morrison in clip form comes across as your clich├ęd dunderheaded lead singer, and we never get much of a sense of the man other than that he was an addict, and his alcoholism and drug abuse were what brought about his untimely demise while jeopardising the careers of his bandmates. A theme of Morrison throwing away all his potential, not to mention all his achievements, all for the sake of his next drink or fix is one which is hard to shake from watching this, leaving DiCillo's attempt to build him up as a true rebel and the encapsulation of the whole counterculture movement of the era on dubious ground. Yes, The Man tried to take him down, but isn't the music the most important thing? The pretentious construction doesn't help much, with scenes from Morrison's lost film HWY mixed with such lines of narration as "the metamorphosis was complete", but you can tell this was sincere, rendering it interesting if not wholly illuminating.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 980 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme music?
Superman: The Movie
The Dark Knight
The Taking of Pelham One Two Three ('74)
Star Wars
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
The Great Escape
Halloween
The Ipcress File
The Magnificent Seven
Back to the Future
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  James Weigle
  Butch Elliot
Paul Shrimpton
  Mark Webb
Enoch Sneed
   

 

Last Updated: