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  Big Trouble in Little China You Know What Jack Burton Always Says?Buy this film here.
Year: 1986
Director: John Carpenter
Stars: Kurt Russell, Kim Cattrall, Dennis Dun, James Hong, Victor Wong, Suzee Pai, Kate Burton, Donald Li, Carter Wong, Peter Kwong, James Pax, Chao Li Chi, Jeff Imada, Rummel Mor, Craig Ng, Jerry Hardin
Genre: Comedy, Action, Martial Arts, Fantasy, Adventure
Rating:  7 (from 11 votes)
Review: Trucker Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) makes a bet with his friend Wang (Dennis Dun), and when he wins, Wang can't pay up immediately. They go to pick up Wang's bride-to-be at the airport, Jack meets Gracie (Kim Cattrall), a lawyer who knows Wang, and they all witness a group of Chinese gangsters kidnap the fiancée. Now they are all involved in an adventure to get her back from the clutches of Lo Pan (James Hong), an ancient magician who has a liking for women with green eyes...

Written by Gary Goldman and David Z. Weinstein and based on W.D. Richter's story, Big Trouble in Little China arrived halfway between Enter the Dragon and The Matrix. It represented a flirtation by Hollywood with Chinese martial arts and fantasy movies, but ended up neither one thing nor the other, transposing the supernatural China of legend with an American Chinatown, apparently cut off from the Western world for reasons of plotting (do the police never take an interest in the kidnappings?).

One thing the Big Trouble does have is tonnes of exposition - during the first half, not five minutes go by without one character explaining the background to Jack. For this reason, the film works better on second viewing, as by that time you'll have worked out who is doing what to whom and why, and sorted out what information is important or otherwise. Basically it's a fast moving, "save the damsels in distress from a fate worse than death" tale, especially when Gracie gets kidnapped (she has green eyes as well as the fiancée).

The saving grace (who is saving Gracie) is Kurt Russell. At first, you think he'll be the kind of musclebound hero who steps in with a big gun to win out against the odds, but after a while you realise Jack is pretty useless, and played with engaging self-deprecation by Russell. In fact, the action doesn't need Jack or Gracie at all, they barely do anything to justify their presence in the plot except provide a Western angle (and have stuff explained to them for our benefit). Russell secures most of the laughs, whether it's accidentally knocking himself out or obliviously sporting lipstick in the finale.

The villains are a colorful bunch. Hong is a great antagonist, making an impact under layers of makeup, playing an impossibly old man or his seven foot tall, supernatural incarnation. His followers include The Three Storms - who each wear huge wicker hats and offer magical powers - one of whom is his right hand man, a martial arts expert who can inflate himself. Add to this a selection of rubber monsters and you have an appealing air of weirdness to offset the more down-to-earth Jack. You might be better off seeing genuine Chinese fantasy movies, but Russell marks Big Trouble out as worth catching. Music by director John Carpenter and Alan Howarth.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark


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John Carpenter  (1948 - )

Skillful American writer-director of supense movies, often in the science fiction or horror genres. Comedy Dark Star and thriller Assault on Precinct 13 were low budget favourites, but mega-hit Halloween kick-started the slasher boom and Carpenter never looked back.

The Fog, Escape from New York, The Thing, the underrated Christine, Big Trouble in Little China, They Live and Prince of Darkness all gained cult standing, but his movies from the nineties onwards have been disappointing: Escape from L.A., Vampires and Ghosts of Mars all sound better than they really are, although The Ward was a fair attempt at a return, if not widely seen. Has a habit of putting his name in the title. He should direct a western sometime.

Review Comments (2)
Posted by:
Phil Michaels
12 Aug 2003
  Great review. A classic film. Jack Burton is an absolute legend!

'It's all in the reflexes'
Posted by:
Darren Jones
12 Sep 2003
  My god! Believe it or not I've never seen this film, until yesterday when I finally relented and watched it. I always thought it didn't look much cop, and how right I was. Maybe time hasn't been too kind on it... though I can't helping thinking time's just given it a good excuse to be crap.

It is dull, it is boring - as Graeme states, the characters constantly and annoyingly explain the plot indirectly (to us) and I really couldn't wait for it to end. Nice hats though!

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