HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
   
 
Newest Articles
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
   
 
  Age of Consent A Painterly EyeBuy this film here.
Year: 1969
Director: Michael Powell
Stars: James Mason, Helen Mirren, Jack MacGowran, Neva Carr-Glynn, Andonia Katsaros, Michael Boddy, Harold Hopkins, Slim DeGrey, Max Meldrum, Frank Thring, Clarissa Kaye-Mason, Judith McGrath, Lenore Caton, Diane Strachan, Roberta Grant
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Artist Bradley Morahan (James Mason) is finding the hustle and bustle of city life getting him down, and as he gazes longingly at an aquarium designed to show off a waterproof Swiss watch, the Great Barrier Reef recreation around it sets his thoughts in motion. One trip to the gallery exhibiting and selling his work makes up his mind: his pieces are being snapped up, but he doesn't much like those doing the buying or the cut and thrust of the art world. So what is his solution? Soon afterwards, he packs his bags and heads off for the sun and sand of the area around the reef, hoping for peace and quiet...

Age of Consent is often judged to be director Michael Powell's final film of note, even though he still had two more movies left in him they were not taken to be among his more important works, one being a Children's Film Foundation effort for kids' matinees, and the other being a little-seen revisitation of a film he had made in the nineteen-thirties. However, in the sixties he had moved away from the United Kingdom after his debacle with the controversial Peeping Tom and had started directing Down Under instead, his first try being the film that was credited with kicking off the Australian film industry which blossomed in the following decade.

That film was not Age of Consent, however, it was a comedy called They're a Weird Mob, as the Norman Lindsay-based novel follow-up might have had comedic elements, but was far more of a drama as aside from a few over the top aims for the funny bone, Powell had the plight of the artist on his mind, with Mason, who was co-producer with him, possibly being seen as a Powell stand-in. Once Bradley reaches his island in the sun, he thinks his troubles are over, and to an extent they are, except that an artist needs his muse and he happens to find her in teenager Cora, played by Helen Mirren in one of her earliest roles (and receiving a credit at the end that mentions she was on loan from the Royal Shakespeare Company - ooh, la-de-da).

Australian accents were obviously not taught at the RSC, because both Mirren and Mason offer two very strange versions of the local inflections, but such is the brightness of the landscape and lush scenery that you're willing to overlook it in a film that comes across as if the cast and crew had been taking a relaxing holiday and opted to make a film while they were out there. It's altogether a very laid back experience, this in spite of the character of Cora's grandmother and guardian (Neva Carr-Glynn) taking a very dim view of Bradley's desire to capture her granddaughter in oils. The grandmother is every interfering and ignorant old busybody who set out to spoil the fun of creative types as she squawks her disapproval of the painter at every opportunity.

But if these sequences as intended as humorous, which they aren't enormously in truth, Powell had a serious point to make about the division between art and humanity's baser desires, and where precisely the two meet. The title comes from the fact that granny doesn't think Cora is old enough to be posing nude for Bradley, while he doesn't see anything wrong with it as he has his artist's hat on and does not plan to take advantage of her. Yet Cora, exploring her newfound sexuality, begins to resent the fact that he just wants her for her body, not in a dirty old man way, simply in wishing to preserve her beauty on canvas. Along with these ponderings are various fluffy moments, such as Bradley's dog getting up to mischief, or his unwanted friend (Jack MacGowran) showing up to disrupt his idyll, which tend to make the overall message seem slighter than perhaps it was meant to, but it's a relaxing watch and that could be all that mattered. The ending seems to go against the rest of it, though. Music by Peter Sculthorpe.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3308 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: