HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Limehouse Golem, The
Frankenstein '80
Good Time
Bucket of Blood, A
Detroit
Hide and Seek
What Happened to Monday
River Wild, The
Veteran
Slumber Party '57
Juliette, or Key of Dreams
Summertime Killer
Sweet Virginia
Ben & Arthur
Your Name
Red Hot Shot, The
New World
Trick Baby
Weapons of Death
Second Best Secret Agent in the Whole Wide World, The
Kills on Wheels
Strait-Jacket
This Man is Dangerous
Burning Paradise
Away
Mistress of the Apes
Incredible Paris Incident
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Fox and His Friends
Bitter Harvest
   
 
Newest Articles
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
The Melville Mood: His Final Two Films on The Melville Collection Blu-ray
Always Agnès: 3 from The Varda Collection Blu-ray
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
   
 
  I Am Sartana Your Angel of Death Back in BlackBuy this film here.
Year: 1969
Director: Giuliano Carnimeo
Stars: Gianni Garko, Frank Wolff, Klaus Kinski, Gordon Mitchell, Ettore Manni, Sal Borgese, Renato Baldini, Federico Boido, José Torres, Tullio Altamura, Jean Louis, John Bartha, Bruno Boschetti, Samson Burke, Celso Faria, Giuseppe Mattei, Franco Pesce
Genre: Western, Action, Weirdo
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: In this first sequel to the hit spaghetti western If You Meet Sartana Pray for Your Death (1968), the North Western Bank lures potential investors by hiring a crack team of bounty hunters to safeguard their money. But no bank vault is safe from a gang of desperados led by that black-clad man of mystery, Sartana. He and his outlaws make of with the loot and soon every gunslinger and sharp-shooting hired killer in the west is on Sartana's trail. Problem is, Sartana (Gianni Garko) is not the man responsible. Understandably irked at being framed by an impostor, Sartana and his ragged sidekick Buddy Ben (Frank Wolff) set out to investigate whilst dodging bullets from such colourfully-monikered murderers as Hot Dead (Klaus Kinski) and Degueyo (Gordon Mitchell).

After series originator Gianfranco Parolini bailed out to direct Sabata (1969), Giuliano Carnimeo stepped in and stuck with the series through the next three sequels. Carnimeo lightens the tone somewhat and also changes the Sartana character away from the spectral avenger of the first movie into a sort of Houdini-like illusionist and trickster. This anticipates his increasingly over-the-top later adventures that would showcase ever more outlandish death-dealing gadgets, although here Sartana relies primarily on his trusty trick-shooting derringer. Gianni Garko breezes through the action with his usual, amiable nonchalant cool, but also relishes his increased amount of interaction with accomplished thespians like Klaus Kinski and Frank Wolf. Former sword and sandal star Gordon Mitchell is sadly given short shrift as someone just there to take a bullet from Sartana, but Kinski plays memorably against type as an affable bounty hunter whose day job funds his gambling habit. You are never entirely sure whether he is friend or foe and with Kinski that's always a good thing.

Of all the Sartana movies, this one comes the closest to being like a detective story, an intriguing new direction for the spaghetti western genre, with Sartana and Buddy Ben cast as a wild west Holmes and Watson. However, the plot proves as tortuous to navigate as its predecessor with the early stages somewhat episodic and sluggish in parts. Carnimeo and his cinematographer Giovanni Bergamini handle the action sequences with great flair utilizing fluid and often ingenious camerawork, but throughout proceedings viewers are left constantly waiting for things to kick into high gear. As before with Sartana, this has ideas and atmosphere by the bucket loads but no real sense of how to use them. Music is credited to Vasco & Mancuso a.k.a. Vassili Kojucharov and Elsio Mancuso and, like the rest of the movie, is agreeable without being inspired. Next up was Have a Good Funeral, My Friend... Sartana Will Pay (1970).

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 1900 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Paul Shrimpton
  Rachel Franke
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Keith Rockmael
   

 

Last Updated: