HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
End of the Century
If Beale Street Could Talk
Raining in the Mountain
Day Shall Come, The
Scandal
Buzzard
Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown
Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, A
Sons of Denmark
Light of My Life
Umbrellas of Cherbourg, The
Jerky Boys, The
Chambre en Ville, Une
Joker
Relaxer
Mustang, The
Baie des Anges, La
Ready or Not
Seven Days in May
Bliss
Hollywood Shuffle
Uncut Gems
Wilt
Daniel Isn't Real
Presidio, The
Curvature
Puzzle
Farewell, The
Challenge of the Tiger
Ad Astra
Winslow Boy, The
Pain and Glory
Judgment at Nuremberg
Rambo: Last Blood
Sansho the Bailiff
Iron Fury
Ride in the Whirlwind
Deathstalker II
Cloak and Dagger
Honeyland
   
 
Newest Articles
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
   
 
  Blind Fury See HearBuy this film here.
Year: 1989
Director: Philip Noyce
Stars: Rutger Hauer, Terry O'Quinn, Brandon Call, Noble Willingham, Lisa Blount, Nick Cassavetes, Rick Overton, Randall 'Tex' Cobb, Charles Cooper, Meg Foster, Shô Kosugi, Paul James Vasquez, Julia González, Woody Watson, Alex Morris, Mark Fickert
Genre: Action, Thriller
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Twenty years ago during the Vietnam War, American soldier Nick Parker (Rutger Hauer) was injured in battle, which left him stumbling around the jungle completely blind. He was found by some Vietnamese villagers who took him under their wing, feeding him and training him to be a master swordsman in spite of his affliction, so by the time he had returned to the United States he was able to get by in the world without assistance. An example of this would be when he was victimised by a group of toughs in a diner, but got his own back by beating them up. However, he will have to draw on all his skills in this fresh adventure...

Blind Fury was based on the Zatoichi series of films from the Far East, an attempt to Americanise a very Japanese hero, which is probably why they updated the character to the present day and offered him a Vietnamese backstory that played out under the credits so we would think, of course, which sightless swordsman wouldn't be able to destroy a roomful of gunwielding thugs with the exotic training he had? Alas, they couldn't help but render the notion preposterous, and with that in mind they evidently opted for the easy way out: if this looked silly, then add a few gags and we can say, hey, we meant to do that.

The actual narrative depicts Nick getting into hot water when he goes to visit his old war buddy Frank Devereaux (Terry O'Quinn), who when we first see him is being hung by his ankles from the top of a Reno casino. This is being carried out to make sure he goes along with the bad guy's wishes and rustles up a load of drugs for them, but Nick is utterly unaware of this when he drops in on Frank's wife (Meg Foster) to say hello to him. Why he has waited twenty years to do so is a mystery, but when he arrives at the house no sooner has he settled down for a cup of coffee than a bunch of baddies descend with a view to kidnapping Frank's Scrappy-Doo-esque son Billy (Brandon Call).

Naturally, Nick sees them off, though cannot prevent them from shooting dead Mrs Devereaux (Meg must have wondered why she bothered showing up) and leaving him in charge of the boy. A road trip transpires with the duo making their way to Reno to meet up with Billy's dad, but all along the way the heavies are trailing them, providing the film with plentiful opportunities to break out the action sequences. Hauer plays this in an almost self-spoofing manner, as if you could mistake him for gormless if it were not for the accuracy of his blade. But the movie surrounding him wants to be parodic as well, so we get scenes where, for example, Nick is forced to drive a car and gets yelled at by a fellow driver "Are you blind?!"

Well, you can guess the answer to that one. But while some could consider this snickering approach to the venerable character as somewhat disrespectful, there's no sense here that the filmmakers are not keen on him at all, if anything they think it's a great idea to have a blind swordsman. It's just that they seem to have cold feet about taking him deadly seriously, which makes for a film that lurches between tearjerking bits, as when Nick has to break the news of his mother's death to Billy, to the action which is presented with the efficiency typical of the time (and features Shô Kosugi for about two seconds), to moments of high comedy - or "High Camp" as one sign on a cable car has it. With this hotchpotch offered up for your delectation, you can go with its admittedly amusing antics, or roll your eyes and grumble about how Hollywood remakes are always off the mark. Music by J. Peter Robinson.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2294 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: