HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Parasite
Looking On the Bright Side
Take Me Somewhere Nice
Simon
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Lineup, The The Need For Violence
Year: 1958
Director: Don Siegel
Stars: Eli Wallach, Robert Keith, Richard Jaeckel, Mary LaRoche, William Leslie, Emile Meyer, Marshall Reed, Raymond Bailey, Vaughn Taylor, Cheryl Callaway, Robert Bailey, Warner Anderson
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: There has been an incident outside a San Francisco airport: a man had handed his case to a porter and the porter had rushed away, flung the case into the back of a waiting cab, and the driver zoomed off at high speed, but so fast he could not control his vehicle. The cab smashed into a truck, ran over a policeman and finally crashed, with the driver dead from the bullet the dying cop managed to fire off at him before he expired. Detectives Ben Guthrie (Warner Anderson) and Al Quine (Emile Meyer) are assigned, and their first problem is to work out why the driver and the now missing porter acted so bizarrely...

The police procedural was a genre which emerged out of the film noir movement of the forties and came to replace it in its thriller genre for a few years of popularity. It was equally as successful on television as it was in film, and there was some crossover between the two media, with some films becoming series and vice versa, as in the case of this, which was drawn from the TV show of the same name. However, while the likes of Dragnet had made big screen outings, but had not really broken out of the confines of their origins, The Lineup went on to become a cult movie whose reputation lasted well after its source was long forgotten.

Indeed, there are many who would never know that it had been a TV series, and only one of the stars of that made it into the film, yet there's a definite tension between the dogged determination of the "Just the facts, ma'am" cops and the villains who are a lot more cinematic, that is to say, a lot more violent. The film divides into two plot threads, with the detectives tracking what turns out to be a smuggling operation to hide packs of heroin in various knick-knacks, and the criminals who are also hunting them down, though they have the advantage of knowing what they are looking for. These bad guys were played by Eli Wallach as Dancer and Robert Keith as Julian, and a strange pairing they make.

For the initial half hour you could have been watching one of the epsiodes, yet once the odd couple of Dancer and Julian make their entrance, a jolt of electricity hits the film as if director Don Siegel, here beginning to make his mark as a master of the thriller, was now getting interested. Dancer is what his partner describes as a psychopath, not addicted to heroin but addicted to hate, by turns charming and dangerous, while Julian likes to think of himself as more refined, when he actually makes your skin crawl as his forte is to note down the last words of those who Dancer kills for him. They're eccentric enough to make the rest of the movie memorable, as the brutality they get up to is pretty strong stuff for 1958.

Siegel, as if anticipating his most famous film Dirty Harry, expertly uses the locations available to him in this, with each setpiece taking place at a distinctive site, be it a steam bath, an aquarium or an ice rink. He may resort to using a bit of rear projection, most obviously in the climactic car chase sequence, but that was the style of the time and doesn't harm the overall effect, which is one of mounting tension. Working from a script by Stirling Silliphant, himself well versed in the thriller technique, Siegel implemented various methods to ramp up the excitement, and tied that in with unpredictable performances from Wallach and Keith, here making the most of what could have been second rate thugs. Watch how the little girl they encounter in the last half hour panics around them, a sure way of making the audience anxious, and listen to Julian's philosophy of crime and his need for violence, all as if to say, leave these people to the lawmen, they're far too dangerous for the public to handle. Music by Mischa Bakaleinikoff.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2649 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Don Siegel  (1912 - 1991)

Respected American director, a former editor, whose action thrillers were second to none. He started out in lower budget movies like The Big Steal, Riot in Cell Bock 11 and The Lineup but come the sixties he started making higher profile work such as the remake of The Killers and Madigan. His fruitful partnership with Clint Eastwood gave us Dirty Harry and Escape from Alcatraz, among others. Another of his finest 1970s films was Charley Varrick.

Siegel had small acting roles in Play Misty for Me and Philip Kaufman's Invasion of the Body Snatchers - he had directed the classic original in the 1950s.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: