HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Alpha
Walking Tall
Blockers
Tongan Ninja
Black '47
Godfather Part II, The
Await Further Instructions
Ewoks: The Battle for Endor
In Order of Disappearance
Charlotte's Web
Meg, The
Christmas Blood
Equalizer 2, The
1985
Mowgli
Ski School
Ant-Man and the Wasp
Age of Shadows, The
Mission: Impossible - Fallout
Othello
First Reformed
Red White and Zero
Death Wish
Cry Wilderness
Heiresses, The
Millhouse: A White Comedy
Skyscraper
Born of Fire
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
Lucia
   
 
Newest Articles
Ha Ha Haaargh: Interview With Camp Death III in 2D! Director Matt Frame
Phone Freak: When a Stranger Calls on Blu-ray
A Name to Conjure With: David Nixon's Magic Box on DVD
Which 1950s Sci-Fi was Scariest? Invaders from Mars vs The Blob
The Empire Strikes Back: Khartoum vs Carry On Up the Khyber
Stan and Ollie's Final Folly: Atoll K on Blu-ray
The Big Grapple: Escape from New York and Its Influence
The Conquest of Everett: The Kenny Everett Video Show on DVD
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
You Know, For Kids: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box
If He Were a Carpenter and It Was the 80s: The Fog, Prince of Darkness and They Live
Tee-Hee, It's 80s Sci-Fi Horror: Night of the Comet, The Stuff and Night of the Creeps
Chance of a Ghost: The Uninvited and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
3 Simian Slashers: Phenomena, Link and Monkey Shines
   
 
  Uncle Buck It's All RelativeBuy this film here.
Year: 1989
Director: John Hughes
Stars: John Candy, Jean Louisa Kelly, Gaby Hoffmann, Macaulay Culkin, Amy Madigan, Elaine Bromka, Garrett M. Brown, Laurie Metcalf, Jay Underwood, Brian Tarantina, Mike Starr, Suzanne Shepherd, William Windom, Dennis Cockrum, Joel Robinson
Genre: Comedy, Drama
Rating:  6 (from 3 votes)
Review: The Russell family have moved away from Indianapolis for dad Robert (Garrett M. Brown) to work elsewhere, and the eldest child Tia (Jean Louisa Kelly) is simmering with resentment over the whole arrangement. Then one night they receive a telephone call from the aunt of mother Cindy (Elaine Bromka) to say that her father has had a heart attack, and she really has to head back to be at his bedside, but the problem is the kids - who can they find to look after them for a week? How about Robert's brother, Buck (John Candy)? He's looking for an excuse not to start working for his girlfriend Chanice (Amy Madigan) anyway...

No, that's not the best reason for looking after your nieces and nephew, but the Russells have no choice and Uncle Buck moves in, though as this was a film written and directed by John Hughes, we can tell he's going to learn a few life lessons and become a reformed character by the end. This one is often overshadowed by Hughes' more obvious teen movies such as Pretty in Pink or The Breakfast Club, but nevertheless has a coterie of fans who not only appreciate the director's way with a character and a comic situation, but also liked to see John Candy get a chance in the limelight after many of his roles being of the supporting variety to that time.

Candy does very well with the Hughes writing, you could almost believe that the part was written for him, and it's certainly one of his better performances, but that doesn't necessarily make it a great film. The belly laughs never arrive, yet neither does it appear as if they were really being aimed for, as much of the humour is personality based, and the dramatic aspects are more emphasised as if Hughes was trying to find middle ground between his earlier comedies and his later, more consistently emotionally serious efforts which he brought out nearer the close of the eighties. Much of this is centered around Buck and his relationship with Tia, who sports a permanent pissed off expression for just about the entirety.

We are supposed to forgive Tia for her meanspirited behaviour as we are Buck for his slobbishness, her because we understand that she has left all her friends behind in Indianapolis, and he because we recognise he has a heart of gold, or something similar. But this being a Hughes movie, he cannot prevent a cruel streak from making itself plain, which is appropriate for the drama, but harder to take in the humorous scenes. Not all the jokes are of the painful variety, as there are plenty of bits with Candy microwaving the washing or taking in the cat only to be told they don't have a cat, but that propensity for gags which give one pause and take you out of the more genial stretches is hard to ignore.

Buck and Tia have a lot to teach one another, of course, and it's all very predictable, so Buck realises that it's time he shaped up and settled down with Chanice, got a job and stopped relying on the racetrack for his funds, and Tia thaws that frosty exterior although she has been so relentlessly nasty throughout that you're half thinking it's all an act she's putting on when she finally brightens up: maybe a mark of an effective performance, there. This has its share of cutesy moments, mostly concentrated on youngest kids Gaby Hoffmann and Macaulay Culkin and how they get on famously with their uncle, yet the fact that he finally sees eye to eye with Tia by committing an act of violent crime is a strange way to pull at the heartstrings. If too much of this shows the machinery it is employing to bring the characters from point A to point B, then we still have Candy to appreciate. Music by Ira Newborn.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2011 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

John Hughes  (1950 - 2009)

American writer/director of some of the 80s most enduring mainstream comedies. Debuted in 1984 with the witty teen romp Sixteen Candles (which introduced Molly Ringwald and John Cusack to the world) before directing The Breakfast Club, one of the decade's defining movies, the following year. Weird Science, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Planes, Trains and Automobiles and Uncle Buck were all huge hits, while Chris Columbus's Home Alone (which Hughes wrote) quickly became the most successful comedy of all time. Quit directing in 1991, but continued to be a prolific screenwriter and producer until his untimely death.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Stately Wayne Manor
George White
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
   

 

Last Updated: