HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Set It Off
No Way Out
Traffik
Pitch Perfect 3
Insidious: The Last Key
Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick, The
Dirty Carnival, A
King of Hearts
Crowhurst
And the Same to You
Racer and the Jailbird
Superman and the Mole-Men
Phantom Thread
Sweet Country
Loophole
Irma La Douce
Brigsby Bear
Wish Upon
Gringo
Finding Vivian Maier
Shape of Water, The
Lady Bird
Endless, The
Universal Soldier: The Return
Lean on Pete
Carnival in Flanders
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
It Came from the Desert
Lodgers, The
Eagle vs Shark
   
 
Newest Articles
And It Was the Dirtiest Harry We Have Seen in a Very Long Time: The Dirty Harry Series
Manor On Movies: The Astounding She Monster
Manor On Movies: Don't be a dolt. That's not a cult (movie)
Wes Anderson's Big Daddies: Steve Zissou and Others
Bad Taste from Outer Space: Galaxy of Terror and Xtro
A Yen for the 1990s: Iron Monkey and Satan Returns
Hey, Punk: Jubilee and Rock 'n' Roll High School
Help! with The Knack: Richard Lester in 1965
Roll Up, Get Yer Free Cinema: The Shorts on the BFI Woodfall Blu-rays
Time for Heroes: The Dam Busters and How I Won the War
Hell is a City: Midnight Cowboy and Taxi Driver
Boris Goes Bonkers, Bela Goes Bats: The Old Dark House and Mark of the Vampire
Charles Bronson's Mid-70s: Breakheart Pass and Others
Kids in America: The Breakfast Club vs Metropolitan
80s Dance-Off: Staying Alive vs Murder-Rock vs Breakin'
   
 
  Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan Revenger's TragedyBuy this film here.
Year: 1982
Director: Nicholas Meyer
Stars: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, James Doohan, Walter Koenig, George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, Bibi Besch, Merritt Butrick, Jeff McBride, Paul Winfield, Kirstie Alley, Ricardo Montalban, Ike Eisenmann, John Vargas, Nicholas Guest
Genre: Science Fiction, Adventure
Rating:  7 (from 3 votes)
Review: Lieutenant Saavik (Kirstie Alley) is captaining the Starship Enterprise when it recieves a distress call from a craft in the Neutral Zone, where it has been agreed the Federation will not go. Disregarding this, she orders the Enterprise to go to the aid of the damaged craft, but as they near it three Klingon battle cruisers approach - there appears to be no way out of this situation as they attack... Because this is an "no-win" problem conjured up by Starfleet as a training program for its cadets. The actual past Captain of the Enterprise, Admiral James T. Kirk (William Shatner) is now part of that training authority, but as it's his birthday he's feeling his age as a fresh no-win conundrum looms...

After the critical failure and perceived financial disappointment of the first adaptation of the popular television series Star Trek to the big screen, Paramount were keen for a sequel but wanted audiences to be more reminded of the original rather than plonking the familiar characters down in a restaging of 2001: A Space Odyssey. So it was that this instalment was created as a sequel not to the first film, but to a previous episode of the series, whose plotline had concerned a genetic superman type called Khan, played by Ricardo Montalban, who Kirk had abandoned on a verdant planet to get rid of him, but also to provide Khan with the home he wished for his people.

Yet one of the themes of Star Trek II is how the past echoes down time into the future, and Kirk, not having thought about his old adversary in years, finds that the opposite has not been true when the U.S.S. Reliant arrives at the planet they believe is a possible site for the new and top secret Genesis device. However, this is not the planet they thought it was as that one was destroyed, and Khan's new home was reduced to rubble and hurricane force storms, something he has been understandably put out about. Now he wants two things: Genesis and vengeance upon Kirk, so how fortuitous that he should be heading a training mission nearby when Khan takes over the Reliant and sends out a message to draw him into his web.

A lot of people at the time saw this as far lighter and more fun than its predecessor, but the odd lighthearted quip aside, it's actually surprisingly downbeat, a grim mood underlined by the fact that nobody feels like turning many lights on. This gives the inevitable battle the look of an old World War II submarine movie, especially with the red alert bathing everything in a scarlet glow. What with Kirk worrying about getting old, a feud he could have done without doing damage to the younger generation who could well have prospered without it, and the eventual recognition that you will lose your friends, the drawbacks of age seem to the main concern on this film's mind.

Which would have been far more resonant if you had the sense that the old crew of the Enterprise had any intention of giving up their vice-like grip on the franchise: this was still five years away from the Next Generation making their debut on television. But the whole film is geared towards keeping that franchise going, so much so that even the supposedly tragic ending is undercut by its determination to set up the sequel. It's not all bad, as Montalban seizes his chances to make what many outside of the hardcore fans would have been pressed to recall into one of the best villains Star Trek ever had - such a shame that Khan and Kirk never meet face to face here. Elsewhere, Kirk's coming to terms with his family seems more of an afterthought when we never get to know them past some perfunctory personality traits, so it's mainly the well-staged action and the great Montalban who provide the diversions. Music by James Horner.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1984 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Stately Wayne Manor
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Jamie Nichols
Andrew Pragasam
George White
   

 

Last Updated: