HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Incredibles 2
Big House, The
Night Eats the World, The
War Bus
Back to Berlin
Leave No Trace
They Shall Not Grow Old
Dollman
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Man Who Invented Christmas, The
Tom's Midnight Garden
Lady, Stay Dead
Thieves, The
My Dear Secretary
I Think We're Alone Now
Amazing Colossal Man, The
Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael
Suzanne
Nae Pasaran!
Kiss of the Dragon
Other Side of the Wind, The
Secret Santa
Wolcott
10.000 Km
Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure
Hitler's Hollywood
Ghost Goes Gear, The
First Purge, The
House of Wax
Mandy
   
 
Newest Articles
The Conquest of Everett: The Kenny Everett Video Show on DVD
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
You Know, For Kids: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box
If He Were a Carpenter and It Was the 80s: The Fog, Prince of Darkness and They Live
Tee-Hee, It's 80s Sci-Fi Horror: Night of the Comet, The Stuff and Night of the Creeps
Chance of a Ghost: The Uninvited and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
3 Simian Slashers: Phenomena, Link and Monkey Shines
When is a Jackie Chan Movie Not a Jackie Chan Movie? Armour of God and City Hunter
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 2
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 1
I-Spy Scotland: The Thirty Nine Steps and Eye of the Needle
Manor On Movies--Black Shampoo--three three three films in one
Manor On Movies--Invasion USA
Time Trap: Last Year in Marienbad and La Jetée
   
 
  Chéri Mon AmourBuy this film here.
Year: 2009
Director: Stephen Frears
Stars: Michelle Pfeiffer, Kathy Bates, Rupert Friend, Felicity Jones, Frances Tomelty, Anita Pallenberg, Harriet Walter, Iben Hjejle, Toby Kebbell, Nichola McAuliffe, Joe Sheridan, Rollo Weeks, Natasha Cashman, Gaye Brown, Jack Walker, Hubert Tellegen
Genre: Romance
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Cast your mind back to 2006 and you might remember a British film making waves across the pond. A film reminiscent of an episode of Alistair McGowan’s Big Impressions, albeit with a little more class in the form of Helen Mirren. Yes, I’m talking about The Queen, a triumph by anyone’s standards, no more so than for its director Stephen Frears.

Frears is one of those people in the industry, whose name you can never quite place. Sure, you know he’s famous but you couldn’t name any of his work straight off, but then eureka! you remember the remarkable My Beautiful Laundrette (written by Hanif Kureishi and released in 1985). The list goes on though, with the more recent hit High Fidelity (2000), arthouse-flick Dirty Pretty Things (2002) and the amiable Mrs Henderson Presents (2005).

Missing from that list is Dangerous Liasons (1988), a film about lust, seduction and revenge (as the tagline put it), which starred Glenn Close, John Malkovich and Michelle Pfeiffer. Frears’s latest outing, Chéri, marks not only a return in collaboration with Pfeiffer, but a return to France and a departure back into the past.

1906, to be precise, and times they are a’changing; and not just because it’s the turn of the 20th century. For some it’s that time in life, which comes to us all, where it’s time to change. And so we meet our protagonists, Léa (Pfeiffer) and Fred (nicknamed Chéri and played by Rupert Friend), who are both in a position to modify their lives.

For Léa the choice isn’t so much her own; she’s a prostitute (sorry, courtesan) in her early forties whose demand from clients is fading fast, and she knows it. Chéri on the other hand is building up quite an inventory of lady-friends, and a reputation his mother, Madame Peloux (played by the insatiable Kathy Bates), would like to put to, ahem, bed.

Being a crafty so-and-so, Mme Peloux calls upon her old friend Léa to help her out. One kiss from Chéri and she’s quite taken with the spoilt young man, so much so that they end up spending six years holed-up together, doing what they do best (you get the picture). It seems that, for the first time, Léa has opened her heart and fallen in love with the young fellow.

However, wily old Mme Peroux has other ideas for her son’s affections and sets him up with young Edmée (Felicity Jones), the daughter of another cocotte companion. Endearingly she tells Léa that it is because she wishes to be a grandmother, but, of course, we all know the pairing has more to do with the money that will come with it.

Léa is forced to conceal her true feelings for her beau, instead warning him against causing pain to his soon-to-be bride – meaning that she won't be available to him when he returns from honeymoon. Indeed she won’t; her embarrassment at the love affair sees her flee to beautiful Biarritz, comforting herself in the arms of a new would-be suitor. But the comfort of another is not enough of either of them, so how will they get on?

The answer lies in the rest of the film, of course, which is a pleasant enough event. Pfeiffer has never looked so incandescent as she does in Chéri, against the charming backdrop of the early part of the 20th century; her style, reminiscent of pre-Raphaelite paintings from that period, shines. So too do the performances of old-timer Kathy Bates and new-comers Felicity Jones and Rupert Friend – 2009 for this Orlando look-alike looks set to be his year.

Sure, it ambles along at a nice little pace, before falling slightly short of its expectations at the end – or maybe that’s the problem, it’s all too inevitable. Nonetheless, and I mean this in the nicest way, it’s film that should be proud of its status as one worthy of a viewing from the sofa on a Sunday afternoon.
Reviewer: Hannah Tough

 

This review has been viewed 2118 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Steven Seagal
Pam Grier
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
George White
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
Alexander Taylor
   

 

Last Updated: