HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Thelma
Stratton
February
Taking of Beverly Hills, The
Marjorie Prime
Hotel Salvation
Mangler, The
Shiraz
Mercy, The
Kickboxer: Retaliation
Molly Maguires, The
Party, The
Dante's Peak
Housemaid, The
Vendetta
Brimstone
Boys in the Trees
Once Were Warriors
Red Planet Mars
Blade Runner 2049
Devil's Express
Belko Experiment, The
Flashback
War of the Arrows
One-Trick Pony
Cloverfield Paradox, The
Beach Rats
In Between
Flesh Feast
Gerald's Game
   
 
Newest Articles
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
Apocalypse 80s UK: Threads and When the Wind Blows
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
   
 
  Let The Right One In Hell's AngelsBuy this film here.
Year: 2008
Director: Tomas Alfredson
Stars: Kåre Hedebrant, Lina Leandersson, Per Ragnar, Henrik Dahl, Karin Bergquist, Peter Carlberg, Ika Nord, Mikael Rahm, Karl-Robert Lindgren, Anders T. Peedu, Pale Olofsson, Cayetano Ruiz, Patrick Rydmark
Genre: Horror, Drama, Thriller, Romance, Fantasy
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: Swedish cinema has always been somewhat amiss in my vocabulary of cinema. Of course it would be hard to sidestep its most prominent figure Ingmar Bergman - and why would anyone want to do that? – and the fabulous texts he produced in his time, but other than that… I wouldn’t have a clue.

Last night I added a new slice of Skandinavian cinema to the list, Let The Right One In, a new release from Tomas Alfredson – a prolific director in his homeland, mainly for television, imdb informs me. Based on a book of the same title (Låt Den Rätte Komma In, in its native language), and adapted for the screen by its author John Adjvide Lindqvist, the story surrounds 12-year old Oskar (Kåre Hedebrant) and Eli (Lina Leandersson), a new kid on the block, so to speak.

For Oskar, a loner, who strongly desires revenge against those that bully him at school, Eli’s arrival at the apartments, signifies a chance at friendship for the first time. Trouble is Eli not only smells a bit funny, as Oskar deftly puts it, but she’s a vampire too; that explains why she only ventures out of the block at night, and can withstand the below-zero temperatures then. Oskar’s left in the dark for the time being though, just appreciative of another ‘weird kid’ on the scene and her pledge to help him out if Conny (Patrick Rydmark) and his gang cause him any pain.

Besides, Eli is rather shrewd in her approach to getting blood – there’s no flying around in a cape to be seen here – as she gets her father to do the ‘dirty’ work for her. Luckily the old man is rather adept with an oxygen pump, knife and bucket, in which he collects his daughter’s evening meal. Trouble is his first catch isn’t quite satisfactory enough for a growing-girl with an eager appetite, and her own attempts to feed herself are ill-judged; her killing is witnessed by the local cat lover.

Fortunately, this time dad is on hand to dispose of the body before it raises too much suspicion in the community, however, the next evening’s expedition to the local school isn’t quite as successful. Not so accomplished as he thinks himself to be, his next prey doesn’t go quietly, and so he is forced to sacrifice himself in order for Eli to survive. But when her previous attempts at sustaining herself were such a failure, what are the chances?

The vista Let The Right One In presents is as beautiful as the story it tells, and whilst, at times, there are some rather ludicrous, and unintentional laugh-out-loud moments, they are soon forgotten as the tender relationship of the main protagonists continues to flower. Indeed, though there are constant barriers between the pair physically (Alfredson highlights this through a repeated motif of walls, which they speak through via Morse code), emotionally they are akin. This perhaps owes to Oskar’s naïve lack of judgment for Eli: when he asks her to go ‘steady’ with him, her response that she “is not a girl” does not sway him from his desire.

But this is precisely what makes their story so endearing. A superb tale, which aptly blends together the burgeoning love between its two kindred spirits, whilst introducing elements of the fantastical. Let The Right One In has certainly carved itself a niche in the market, straddling the realms of art-house cinema for anyone not accustomed to the usual gore-fest that vampire cinema might suggest, whilst providing enough to keep the blood-thirsty hungry for more.


Reviewer: Hannah Tough

 

This review has been viewed 1723 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Jason Cook
  Andrew Irvine
Ian Phillips
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: