HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Apartment 1BR
1776
Parasite
Looking On the Bright Side
Take Me Somewhere Nice
Simon
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Daleks' Invasion Earth: 2150 A.D. The Doctor Will See You Now
Year: 1966
Director: Gordon Flemyng
Stars: Peter Cushing, Bernard Cribbins, Ray Brooks, Andrew Keir, Roberta Tovey, Jill Curzon, Roger Avon, Geoffrey Cheshire, Keith Marsh, Philip Madoc, Steve Peters, Eddie Powell, Godfrey Quigley, Peter Reynolds, Bernard Spear, Sheila Steafel, Eileen Way
Genre: Science Fiction, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: London policeman Tom Campbell (Bernard Cribbins) is walking down a street when he stops at the window of a travel agent's and wistfully gazes at the holidays on offer. Suddenly a man creeps up behind him and wallops him over the head - a bank robbery is taking place and Tom is being forced out of the way. But he is not entirely knocked out, and makes it to a police telephone box to call for help, yet when he opens the door and tumbles inside, he cannot believe his eyes. There is a large room where the telephone should be, and an elderly gent (Peter Cushing) is approaching him...

And that man is Doctor Who, who just to annoy future fans calls himself that as well, even though it's the name of programme, goddammit, and the character he plays is simply known as The Doctor. But there are a few things you have to overlook in this, the sequel to the previous Daleks film, if you want to reconcile it with its source. Happily, these are only means to streamline the original serial, scripted by Terry Nation, into a smoother movie experience, and the relationship between these two films and the decades-lasting series is quite fun for the non-obsessive.

Cushing is The Doctor once more, falling back on his dotty professor style of role that is at odds with the somewhat more irascible version William Hartnell portrayed on television. He takes Tom, along with his granddaughters Susan (Roberta Tovey was back too) and Louise (Jill Curzon), to the future London of 2150 A.D. and there, as the title suggests, they encounter the Daleks for the second time. As Nation freely admitted these mechanical villains were based on the Nazis, it's only natural that their threat of invading Britain during World War II should come to pass in fictional form.

And in a different guise, of course; the Daleks are every bit as effective here as they were on television, with screenwriter and co-producer Milton Subotsky recreating many key scenes from the original such as the Dalek emerging from the Thames to menace the heroes. Those heroes are split up very quickly and given their own subplots to deal with in the fight against the alien invaders, who, The Doc surmises, now use magnetism to move without the aid of their metal floor from the first film. This means they can move around anywhere they want, although we never see them tackle the stairs - ha, ha!

But seriously, or as serious as you can be with this film, which in spite of its status as a piece of fluff to keep those sixties kids quiet during Saturday morning screenings at their local cinema, is pretty grim. Yes, Subotsky lightens the mood in places, witness Cribbins (who would triumphantly appear in the official Doctor Who on T.V. over forty years later) and his pantomime with the Robomen, but that Nation grit is not to be denied, so we have freedom fighters being callously killed and citizens turned informers, all to show how Britain is suffering under these extreme conditions. This is a lot less colourful than the previous film, and Cushing may being playing it for mirth, but there's an overcast look to this which lends the adventure a grave air suggesting these Daleks are no laughing matter. Music by Bill McGuffie.

[Studio Canal's Blu-ray offers a spiffing print, along with extras such as a restoration featurette, an interview with Bernard Cribbins, and the trailer.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4706 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)
Posted by:
Butch Elliot
Date:
8 Jan 2009
  I'm kind of a Doctor Who novice, but enjoyed this slice of sixties sci-fi. Wasn't the same plot serialised on TV? How does this compare to that one?
       
Posted by:
Graeme Clark
Date:
8 Jan 2009
  Yes, both the 60s DW movies are taken from TV serials. The main novelty for viewers at the time would be that the film is in colour while it was in black and white on TV, but I think the film stands up in comparison. It's shorter as a story, though sticks pretty close to the source, with a few of the main characters altered. Maybe the b&w makes you take it more seriously on TV, there wasn't much room for jokiness in that one.

There was going to be a third Daleks movie but this one had disappointing returns, so two was all we got.
       


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: