HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Limehouse Golem, The
Frankenstein '80
Good Time
Bucket of Blood, A
Detroit
Hide and Seek
What Happened to Monday
River Wild, The
Veteran
Slumber Party '57
Juliette, or Key of Dreams
Summertime Killer
Sweet Virginia
Ben & Arthur
Your Name
Red Hot Shot, The
New World
Trick Baby
Weapons of Death
Second Best Secret Agent in the Whole Wide World, The
Kills on Wheels
Strait-Jacket
This Man is Dangerous
Burning Paradise
Away
Mistress of the Apes
Incredible Paris Incident
Star Wars: The Last Jedi
Fox and His Friends
Bitter Harvest
   
 
Newest Articles
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
The Melville Mood: His Final Two Films on The Melville Collection Blu-ray
Always Agnès: 3 from The Varda Collection Blu-ray
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
   
 
  C.R.A.Z.Y. Growing Up NormalBuy this film here.
Year: 2005
Director: Jean-Marc Vallée
Stars: Michel Côté, Marc-André Grondin, Danielle Proulx, Émile Vallée, Pierre-Luc Brillant, Maxime Tremblay, Alex Gravel, Natasha Thompson, Johane Lebrun, Mariloup Wolfe, Francis Ducharme, Hélène Grégoire, Michel Laperrière, Jean-Louis Roux, Mohamed Majd
Genre: Drama
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Zachary Beaulieu (Marc-Andre Grondin) has never liked Christmas much, because he was born on Christmas Day, which meant he only ever got one set of presents and never felt that it was his special time as he had to share it with Jesus Christ. His mother (Danielle Proulx), on the other hand, was delighted and took it to mean that her son, the youngest of four, was somehow sainted and carried a gift of healing, despite her music fan husband (Michel Côté) wishing that he would display a talent for music and buying him instruments for his birthday accordingly. Yet Zachary was never one to fit in...

This heartfelt family drama was scripted by the director, Jean-Marc Vallée, and his co-writer François Boulay whose early life this was based on, but if anything it became known for the trouble it had with the song rights which ate into a substantial part of the budget. Vallée persevered, however, and ensured that we did indeed hear Patsy Cline, David Bowie, Pink Floyd and Giorgio Moroder on the soundtrack at crucial moments, and this went some way to giving C.R.A.Z.Y. authenticity to the periods it was set in, starting in the sixties and lasting through to the eighties.

We're in coming of age territory once again, and Vallée weaves a rich tapestry of emotion and events which can grow overwhelming after a while, but lends the film its particular character. Music is important in Zachary's life, as it is in his father's, and you would think that would provide a bond between them, yet as Zac points out, after about the age of six his father became his enemy. First this was because he was denied a pram to play with when little, and offered an unwanted hockey game instead, but this is merely the start of his sexuality clashing with his father's.

It takes until the seventies for this situation to come to a head, but meantime we see that Zac thinks his brothers are morons, ranging from one who reads everything he can get his eyes on, to a sports fanatic, to Raymond (Pierre-Luc Brillant), who he believes is his nemesis. Raymond will grow up to be a drug addicted wastrel, but it's a mark of how strong family ties are that nobody, not even Zac who despises his older brother, gives up on him. This is significant because the Beaulieus see Zac's emerging homosexuality as more problematic than Raymond's addiction.

Zachary's mother never loses faith in him, still believing him to be religiously important, and there is a thread of spirituality running through C.R.A.Z.Y. which near the end eschews the earlier, jokier treatment of the protagonist in church and literally saves him from a crisis, leaving you wondering how seriously we're supposed to take Catholicism or religion as a whole as portrayed here. There are certainly funny lines to enjoy, but there's an earnestness to the film which can inadvertantly show homosexuality to be a massive inconvenience, especially when Vallée is so sympathetic to every character, even the bigoted ones. Fortunately, while there are parts intended to have you musing on anything from the power of popular music to those tests for the family, the film stays lively and engaging, with a trite but reassuring ending after the pain the characters have gone through.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2178 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Paul Shrimpton
  Rachel Franke
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Keith Rockmael
   

 

Last Updated: