HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Wildlife
X2
Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese
Heiress, The
Cold Pursuit
Firestorm
Dogs of War, The
Holy Mountain, The
Piercing
Under Fire
Jennifer on My Mind
People on Sunday
Lethal Weapon 4
Downhill Racer
Emily
Odette
Escape Room
Across the Pacific
Madeline's Madeline
You're Gonna Miss Me
Iron Sky: The Coming Race
Derby
Mortal Engines
Union City
Knife+Heart
Little Stranger, The
Sauvage
Watermelon Man
Wandering Earth, The
Good Fairy, The
Killer Party
Holmes & Watson
Monster in the Closet
Sand, The
Glass
My Brilliant Career
Knife for the Ladies, A
Man in the Attic
Destroyer
Fillmore
   
 
Newest Articles
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
How 1970s Can You Get? Cliff Richard in Take Me High vs Never Too Young to Rock
A Perfect Engine, An Eating Machine: The Jaws Series
   
 
  Across the Universe Please Please StopBuy this film here.
Year: 2007
Director: Julie Taymor
Stars: Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess, Joe Anderson, Dana Fuchs, Martin Luther, T.V. Carpio, Spencer Liff, Lisa Hogg, Nicholas Lumley, Michael Ryan, Angela Mounsey, Erin Elliott, Robert Clohessy, Eddie Izzard, Joe Cocker, Bono, Salma Hayek
Genre: Musical
Rating:  3 (from 1 vote)
Review: Two people separated by an ocean, that's Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood) and Jude (Jim Sturgess), with she in America and he in Britain. Little do they know as Lucy waves goodbye to her sweetheart as he goes off to war, and Jude decides to pack in his job in the Liverpool docks and set sail on a ship around the world that they will become very significant in each other's lives. Jude wishes to track down his father, the G.I. who got his mother pregnant then fled back to the States, so when he reaches there he jumps ship and sets off to a university where he knows his father works...

Across the Universe was the film equivalent of those stage musicals which round up as many songs by one artist as they can pack into two hours, then shoehorn them into a story that they hope will provide some unity to the tunes - other than their source, naturally. It met with a mixed reaction as veteran writers Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais allied those famous Beatles songs to a portrait of the social upheaval of the sixties, and in truth the results were less than satisfying. The main trouble was that in trying to be specific, the film came across as hopelessly contrived.

Everyone who has heard the music of Beatles has their own images that spring to mind whenever it is played, whether it be the place and situation they first heard it, or some echo of pop culture, but here the cast trilled their way through a selection of hits and album tracks that suggested the Fab Four's oeuvre was in fact show tunes. It's not helped by a narrative that strains visibly to incorporate the music, most obviously in the manner in which characters are given the names of people mentioned in the original material: Lucy, Jude, Prudence, Jo-Jo, Ivana Holdyourhand, and so on.

This quickly becomes ridiculous, and after a while you're counting the minutes until the songs the characters' names appear in turn up, with Prudence locking herself in a cupboard so she can come out and play, for example. It's only a matter of time, you'll be thinking, before Lucy gets shot into the sky with some diamonds to accompany her. Lucy and Jude meet because Jude befriends her brother Max (silver hammer not pictured) while at the university and he takes Jude back home to meet the folks. From there they head off to New York so they can become involved with civil rights protests and for Max, the Vietnam War.

All the way through this is an almost constant barrage of Beatles, although for some reason there is no reference to the reality of the band within the fiction of the film, so where all these songs are meant to be hailing from is something of a mystery. At least those onscreen can hold a tune, but the sole thing separating this from the seventies Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band debacle is that Across the Universe is painfully sincere throughout, as if what they were doing was singing hymns in church. Eventually the whole enterprise really begins to grate, with guest stars like Eddie Izzard and Bongo from U2 showing up to put yet more "not as good as the original" spins on another classic. That grinding, relentless respect is what finally does the film no good, and even the most fun numbers are drained of their sparkle by its po-faced quality.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4385 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Rachel Franke
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Paul Shrimpton
Darren Jones
George White
   

 

Last Updated: