HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Aurora Encounter, The
Breaking In
Breaking In
Please Stand By
Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County, The
Deadpool 2
Smart Money
Lupin the Third vs. Detective Conan: The Movie
Gangsta
3 Nuts in Search of a Bolt
Magic Serpent, The
That's Not Me
There Goes the Bride
Billy the Kid versus Dracula
Liquid Sword
I, Tonya
Universal Soldier: Regeneration
Bad Match
Güeros
Anchor and Hope
One, The
Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie
Lucky
Still of the Night
Home Sweet Homicide
Mannaja - A Man Called Blade
Spitfire
Killers from Space
Castle of the Creeping Flesh
Ghost Stories
   
 
Newest Articles
Manor On Movies--Black Shampoo--three three three films in one
Manor On Movies--Invasion USA
Time Trap: Last Year in Marienbad and La Jetée
Gaining Three Stone: Salvador, Natural Born Killers and Savages
Right Said Bernard: Cribbins on DVD
1969: The Year Westerns Couldn't Get Past
A Network Horror Double Bill: Assault and Death Line on Blu-ray
The Edie Levy: Edie Sedgwick, Andy Warhol and Ciao! Manhattan
The Ultimate Trip: The Original Psychedelic Movies
Players of Games: Willy Wonka, Tron and Ready Player One
What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round? The Ends of The Monkees
Flings and Arrows: Conquest vs Flesh + Blood
Orson Around: F for Fake and The Late Great Planet Earth
ITC What You Did There: Retro-Action on Blu-ray
And It Was the Dirtiest Harry We Have Seen in a Very Long Time: The Dirty Harry Series
   
 
  Blacula Cape FearBuy this film here.
Year: 1972
Director: William Crain
Stars: William Marshall, Vonetta McGee, Denise Nicholas, Thalmus Rasulala, Gordon Pinsent, Charles Macaulay, Emily Yancy, Lance Taylor Sr, Ted Harris, Rick Metzler, Ji-Tu Cumbuka, Logan Field, Ketty Lester, Elisha Cook Jr, Eric Brotherson
Genre: Horror
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: The year is 1790 and Prince Mamuwalde (William Marshall) is in Transylvania visiting one Count Dracula (Charles Macaulay) with the hopes of securing his signature on a petition he has drawn up to stop the slave trade. However, the evening takes a nasty turn when the previously civilised Count voices his opinion that he sees nothing wrong with slavery, and even says that he would be happy to have Mamuwalde's wife Luva (Vonetta McGee) as a slave. The Prince is outraged, but Dracula has the upper hand and his servants overcome him while he is vampirised to become... Blacula!

Now if you thought Blacula was the bloke out of Quantum Leap and Star Trek: Enterprise, then this blaxploitation horror should set you straight. Scripted by Raymond Koenig and Joan Torres, both of whom had this film's sequel as their only other credit, this low budget shocker started a short-lived fad for chillers with mostly African-American casts, including Blackenstein and Dr Black, Mr Hyde, most of which were sadly impoverished both financially and inspirationally. What Blacula had up its sleeve was a commanding star performance to really make it stand out.

That performance came from much respected theatre actor William Marshall, whose Othello was the stuff of legend. He fared less well on the big screen, however, as with his resonant and sonorous tones and regal air it seemed that producers were unsure of how to cast him. Funnily enough, this made him perfect for the vampire role here and he was by far the highlight of a film that looked as though it had thought up its title before anyone could conjure up a decent script. And the script, as it turned out, had a definite second hand appearance.

Blacula is trapped in a coffin for what Dracula presumes will be forever, but wouldn't you know it, that coffin is transported to Los Angeles by a couple of camp gay antique dealers. Once in their warehouse, they open it up and before long are the bloodsucker's first victims, but if the filmmakers did anything right, it's that they made Mamuwalde far more sympathetic than the typical horror movie villain. This means that once he gets out and about, the anti-hero finds himself regretting this state and pining for his lost love, which in a twist lifted from The Mummy, transpires has been reincarnated.

So Vonetta McGee also plays Tina, who by frankly unbelievable coincidence is noticed by Blacula one night and followed, which is not the kind of behaviour that endears him to her and she runs for it, dropping her purse. After tracking her down through the contents, he persuades her that his intentions were noble, and Marshall manages to be quite touching in his affection for Tina, even to the extent of going to a nightclub with her a few times to hear the Hues Corporation and hang out with her friends (he doesn't strut his stuff on the dancefloor, however: a missed opportunity). Sadly, one of her friends is Dr Thomas (Thalmus Rasulala), a police officer who is determined to uncover the source of the spate of vampirism afflicting the city, and Blacula's nights are numbered. There's a decent notion behind this film, but only the cape-sporting Marshall makes the most of it, that is, it's a little disappointing. Music by Gene Page.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3277 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Steven Seagal
Pam Grier
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Stately Wayne Manor
  Patrick Keenan
Enoch Sneed
Ian Phillips
  Afra Khan
  Dan Malone
   

 

Last Updated: