HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Traffik
Pitch Perfect 3
Insidious: The Last Key
Goalie's Anxiety at the Penalty Kick, The
Dirty Carnival, A
King of Hearts
Crowhurst
And the Same to You
Racer and the Jailbird
Superman and the Mole-Men
Phantom Thread
Sweet Country
Loophole
Irma La Douce
Brigsby Bear
Wish Upon
Gringo
Finding Vivian Maier
Shape of Water, The
Lady Bird
Endless, The
Universal Soldier: The Return
Lean on Pete
Carnival in Flanders
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
It Came from the Desert
Lodgers, The
Eagle vs Shark
American Assassin
Die, Mommie, Die!
   
 
Newest Articles
And It Was the Dirtiest Harry We Have Seen in a Very Long Time: The Dirty Harry Series
Manor On Movies: The Astounding She Monster
Manor On Movies: Don't be a dolt. That's not a cult (movie)
Wes Anderson's Big Daddies: Steve Zissou and Others
Bad Taste from Outer Space: Galaxy of Terror and Xtro
A Yen for the 1990s: Iron Monkey and Satan Returns
Hey, Punk: Jubilee and Rock 'n' Roll High School
Help! with The Knack: Richard Lester in 1965
Roll Up, Get Yer Free Cinema: The Shorts on the BFI Woodfall Blu-rays
Time for Heroes: The Dam Busters and How I Won the War
Hell is a City: Midnight Cowboy and Taxi Driver
Boris Goes Bonkers, Bela Goes Bats: The Old Dark House and Mark of the Vampire
Charles Bronson's Mid-70s: Breakheart Pass and Others
Kids in America: The Breakfast Club vs Metropolitan
80s Dance-Off: Staying Alive vs Murder-Rock vs Breakin'
   
 
  Book of Revelation, The Never Be The Same AgainBuy this film here.
Year: 2006
Director: Ana Kokkinos
Stars: Tom Long, Greta Scacchi, Colin Friels, Deborah Mailman, Anna Torv, Zoe Coyle, Nadine Garner, Olivia Pigeot, Ana Maria Belo, Belinda McClory, Sybilla Budd, Geneviève Picot, Nina Liu, Zoe Naylor, Odette Joannidis
Genre: Drama, Sex
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Daniel (Tom Long) is a successful dancer who has made a name for himself on the Australian scene with his girlfriend Bridget (Anna Torv) and today they are rehearsing for their latest production under the direction of their tutor, Isabel (Greta Scacchi). After a long stretch of dancing, where Isabel stresses to Daniel he must forget his ego if he wants to attain perfection in the art, it's time for a break and Bridget asks him to go out and buy her a pack of cigarettes. Not wishing to protest, he complies - and that's the last anyone sees of him...

...for a while at least. This mightily pretentious drama was based on a novel by Rupert Thomson, and adapted by its director Ana Kokkinos with Andrew Bovell, whose last screen project had been the intriguing Lantana. The Book of Revelation, on the other hand, purported to lay the masculine ego bare by subjecting it to humiliation by females, but by taking an unlikely premise, it failed to build up much of a point other than the simple fact that traumatic experiences can really damage a person - something that applies to either gender.

In a set up reminiscent of seventies porn film Behind the Green Door only with a role reversal, what has happened to Daniel is revealed in flashback as he was abducted by three masked and cowled women who made him their sexual plaything. This plays out like a sadomasochistic fantasy as our troubled hero is put through various ordeals which only the fact that it's women putting him through them means that he's able to be aroused for them to carry out their desires. We never really find out the reason for this, and the more it goes on the more artificial it appears.

Once Daniel is released, he has a lot of soul searching to do and goes to the police, but is too embarrassed to admit what has happened to him (and the cops taking his report don't seem too compassionate). He ends up splitting with Bridget (Torv plays one of the captors, although as we never see her face in those sequences it's hard to know how much to read into that casting) and leaving dance behind as his quest to discover the identity of the abductors becomes all-consuming. Throughout all this, a detective, Olsen (Colin Friels) looms in the background, willing Daniel to confess to him.

After a while, it looks as though Daniel has got over his ordeal and he even gets another girlfriend, Julie (Deborah Mailman) to whom he seems like a nice, sensitive chap. But the assault on his manhood (and his arse, for that matter) has left emotional scars and we're supposed to muse over what it means to have your masculinity challenged by a bunch of crazed females, but this is hamstrung by the way that nobody in the film seems very sure beyond the obvious, i.e. it would be a deeply worrying occurence. By the end, Daniel's quest leads him up some dark alleys and he is finally able to open up to Olsen, but as it's difficult to get into his head at the best of times, what you're left with is a rather ridiculous and po-faced drama that prompts an unenlightened shrug. Music by Cezary Skubiszewski.

[Universal's DVD has interviews with the cast and crew and behind the scenes clips as extras.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2325 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Stately Wayne Manor
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Jamie Nichols
Andrew Pragasam
George White
   

 

Last Updated: