HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Flamingo Kid, The
Queen, The
Avengers: Endgame
Vanishing Act
Critters Attack!
Prison on Fire
Dragged Across Concrete
Do the Right Thing
Hellboy
Pond Life
Lego Movie 2: The Second Part, The
Third Wife, The
Shazam!
Follow Me
Leto
Fugitive Girls
Missing Link
Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, The
Pet Sematary
Oh... Rosalinda!!
Dumbo
Kaleidoscope
Night Is Short, Walk On Girl
Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang, The
Puppet Master: The Littlest Reich
Klute
Meow
Killer Crocodile
Nutcracker Prince, The
Secret World of Og, The
Benjamin
Fifth Cord, The
Man Could Get Killed, A
Cyborg 009: Kaiju War
Heavy Trip
Nightmare Weekend
Blue Ice
Great Scout & Cathouse Thursday, The
Incident, The
Hell's Angels
   
 
Newest Articles
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
The Hole in the Ground: Director Lee Cronin Interview
She's Missing: Director Alexandra McGuinness Interview
Woo's the Boss: Last Hurrah for Chivalry & Hand of Death on Blu-ray
Get Ahead in Showbiz: Expresso Bongo and It's All Happening
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
   
 
  Dracula's Daughter Following In Daddy's FootstepsBuy this film here.
Year: 1936
Director: Lambert Hillyer
Stars: Otto Kruger, Gloria Holden, Marguerite Churchill, Edward Van Sloan, Gilbert Emery, Irving Pichel, Halliwell Hobbes, Billy Bevan, Nan Grey, Hedda Hopper, Claud Allister, Edgar Norton, E.E. Clive
Genre: Horror
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: A couple of policemen are investigating the old abbey, and discover a body at the bottom of a staircase, its neck recently broken. They are soon joined by a little old man who tells them that the person who killed him is now dead himself, because he is Professor Van Helsing (Edward Van Sloan) and he has just driven a stake through the heart of Count Dracula. Despite his protestations that he has destroyed a vampire, he is arrested and taken to Scotland Yard where it is explained to him he will either be locked up in an insane asylum or hanged for murder. But what if there were another in the Dracula line...?

And what if she were his daughter? And what if she were played by Gloria Holden in her most famous role, such as it was? For some, no matter her haunted performance it will forever be a disappointment that Bela Lugosi was not asked back to reprise his most celebrated character and nothing in this sequel, which takes off immediately after the first film ended, really makes up for that. But what this did was bring out the sexuality in the vampire myth far better than the previous instalment had, and there are those who viewed the Countess's struggle with bloodsucking as a metaphor for lesbianism.

It's not a bad theory, but she does bite the necks of men as well so it's not entirely watertight. In effect, the Countess falls in love with a psychiatrist called Jeffrey Garth (Otto Kruger) and views him as her personal saviour now that her corrupting father has died (well, he was already dead, but he's really finished now). She actually steals the body from under the noses of the police and builds her own funeral pyre, then makes her entrance in polite society, but not before her manservant Sandor (Irving Pichel, also a successful director) reminds her of where she came from.

And what, apparently, she can never completely eschew. The scenes with Holden are quite absorbing, watching her interact with the others is truly fascinating, especially when she is about to sink her fangs into someone. The film's most notorious sequence has Sandor bring home suicide-contemplating Lili (beautiful Nan Grey) from the streets under the pretence of posing as a model for one of the Countess's paintings (she's a cultured sort, you see - or she would like to be) only for her to be seduced, hypnotised and vampirised, all of which may not be explicit, but carries a sexual charge unusual for the era nonetheless.

However, bits of business like that are really only half the story because to unbalance that mood of encroaching doom and desperate longing there is quite some level of comic relief. Garth has a secretary/love interest in Janet (Marguerite Churchill), who provides supposed laughs in her light-hearted antics, such as phoning up Garth when he's at the Countess's home with a prank call. All very well, but it does render this film as two halves pulling in opposite directions. On the other hand, one pleasing aspect is that Van Helsing would have been treated as some kind of maniac in the real world with his preposterous stories, and it's only the fact that the vampirism is unstopped that saves him from incarceration. You may prefer Dracula's Daughter to the original, but really they're on a par with each other, with good and bad points to both.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2510 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Darren Jones
   

 

Last Updated: