HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Incredibles 2
Big House, The
Night Eats the World, The
War Bus
Back to Berlin
Leave No Trace
They Shall Not Grow Old
Dollman
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Man Who Invented Christmas, The
Tom's Midnight Garden
Lady, Stay Dead
Thieves, The
My Dear Secretary
I Think We're Alone Now
Amazing Colossal Man, The
Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael
Suzanne
Nae Pasaran!
Kiss of the Dragon
Other Side of the Wind, The
Secret Santa
Wolcott
10.000 Km
Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure
Hitler's Hollywood
Ghost Goes Gear, The
First Purge, The
House of Wax
Mandy
   
 
Newest Articles
The Conquest of Everett: The Kenny Everett Video Show on DVD
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
You Know, For Kids: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box
If He Were a Carpenter and It Was the 80s: The Fog, Prince of Darkness and They Live
Tee-Hee, It's 80s Sci-Fi Horror: Night of the Comet, The Stuff and Night of the Creeps
Chance of a Ghost: The Uninvited and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
3 Simian Slashers: Phenomena, Link and Monkey Shines
When is a Jackie Chan Movie Not a Jackie Chan Movie? Armour of God and City Hunter
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 2
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 1
I-Spy Scotland: The Thirty Nine Steps and Eye of the Needle
Manor On Movies--Black Shampoo--three three three films in one
Manor On Movies--Invasion USA
Time Trap: Last Year in Marienbad and La Jetée
   
 
  Careful He Might Hear You A Thin Line Between Love And HateBuy this film here.
Year: 1983
Director: Carl Schultz
Stars: Wendy Hughes, Robyn Nevin, Nicholas Gledhill, John Hargreaves, Geraldine Turner, Isabelle Anderson, Peter Whitford, Colleen Clifford, Edward Howell, Jacqueline Kott, Len London, Beth Child, Colin Croft, Virginia Portingale, Steve Fifield, Pega Williams
Genre: Drama
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Six-year-old P.S. (Nicholas Gledhill), so called because he was a postscript to his mother's life, lives with his Aunt Lila (Robyn Nevins) and Uncle George (Peter Whitford) and they do their best to keep him happy during the Depression in Australia. P.S. has never seen his father, who left his mother before he was born to go prospecting for gold, but one day when visiting her grave Lila notices someone has placed flowers there: a man, by the looks of it. This heralds an upheaval in P.S.'s life when his hitherto unknown Aunt Vanessa (Wendy Hughes) walks into his life, determined to seize custody of him...

A strange and troubling melodrama, Careful He Might Hear You was adapted from the prize-winning novel by Sumner Locke Elliott by Michael Jenkins, a television director who broke into films with this effort. Directed by Carl Schultz with an odd mixture of sensitivity and overwrought emotion, the plot essentially takes the form of the custody battle between the couple who P.S. really wishes to stay with, that is Lila and George, and Vanessa, a cold creature who lives in a huge, empty house and whose loneliness is not assuaged by her wealth.

In a captivating performance that bolstered her position as one of Australia's finest actresses, Hughes has a challenge on her hands with Vanessa. To be kind one would call the character eccentric, to be unkind you would say she was an emotionally stunted weirdo heading straight into the arms of a nervous breakdown. She believes that if she has a child in her life, and P.S. is that unlucky soul she has picked, she will be more fulfilled, and as the boy's father has signed an agreement to allow her to be guardian of him, Lila doesn't have a legal leg to stand on.

We may see things from P.S.'s point of view, but from what he picks up we can put together the bigger picture of what is driving these people. It is settled that he will spend weekdays with Vanessa and weekends with Lila (who is not best pleased, but what can she do?), and he begins attending a private school where his lower class ways make him the subject of bullying, and when he returns in the afternoon piano and riding lessons are the order of the day. Naturally, he hates all this but the emotional blackmail of the adults on both sides leaves him confused, to say the least, with the stories and at times outright lies they tell him hardening his heart.

We can see that no matter what she thinks, Vanessa is no-one's idea of the perfect mother and her money cannot buy P.S.'s love. Then there is her fear of storms, which sees her grabbing the child, holding him and crying for Logan, a practice she asks him to keep a secret. Who is Logan? The boy's father, who turns up to see him for the first time (played by John Hargreaves, another great Australian talent) at Vanessa's mansion and ends up weeping in front of him for the mess he has landed his son in through neglect and poor choices, then leaves for good, as far as we can tell. It's difficult to convey the disquieting atmosphere of this film as we see a child being steadily messed up, not helped by a near constant score by Ray Cook which brings out the hysteria and damaging feelings the characters endure. If, finally, we are sorry for how Vanessa's failings scupper her life, then she is not the only one who deserves our sympathy.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2534 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Steven Seagal
Pam Grier
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
George White
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
Alexander Taylor
   

 

Last Updated: