HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Den of Thieves
Cry Baby Killer, The
Ritual, The
Les Girls
Death of Stalin, The
Mission, The
Wild Life, The
Eve of Destruction
Mad Death, The
Lost in Vagueness
Sleeping Beauty
Allure
In Search of Dracula
Fantastic Woman, A
Emmanuelle II
Far from Vietnam
Inherit the Wind
Post, The
King Frat
Commuter, The
Mister Buddwing
Kiki's Delivery Service
Z-O-M-B-I-E-S
Mansfield 66/67
Old Enough
Bleeding Steel
Double Hour, The
My Generation
Geostorm
Pendulum
   
 
Newest Articles
Boris Goes Bonkers, Bela Goes Bats: The Old Dark House and Mark of the Vampire
Charles Bronson's Mid-70s: Breakheart Pass and Others
Kids in America: The Breakfast Club vs Metropolitan
80s Dance-Off: Staying Alive vs Murder-Rock vs Breakin'
The Cinematic Darkside of Donald Crowhurst
Dutch Courage: The Flodder Series
Coming of Age: Boys on Film 18 - Heroes on DVD
Country and Irish - The secret history of Irish pop culture
Wash All This Scum Off the Streets: Vigilante Movies
Force the Issue: Star Wars' Tricky Middle Prequels and Sequels
Rediscovered: The Avengers - Tunnel of Fear on DVD
Sword Play: An Actor's Revenge vs Your Average Zatoichi Movie
Super Sleuths: The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes on DVD
Stop That, It's Silly: The Ends of Monty Python
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
   
 
  Likely Lads, The Quiet DesperationBuy this film here.
Year: 1976
Director: Michael Tuchner
Stars: Rodney Bewes, James Bolam, Brigit Forsyth, Mary Tamm, Sheila Fearn, Zena Walker, Judy Buxton, Alun Armstrong, Vicki Michelle, Ronald Lacey, Anulka Dziubinska, Penny Irving
Genre: Comedy
Rating:  8 (from 2 votes)
Review: Working class, Newcastle-born Bob Ferris (Rodney Bewes) and Terry Collier (James Bolam) have been friends since childhood, but are finding that times are moving on even if they don't like the idea of settling down. When the street where they used to live is demolished, they begin to have a mid-life crisis of sorts as Bob has to face life with his wife, the formidable Thelma (Brigit Forsyth), and recently divorced Terry acquires a new girlfriend (Mary Tamm).

"Hello Thelma. Pet." The Likely Lads were created by Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais for their sixties sitcom, but this grittier film is based on their seventies TV revival, the classic Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads? At this time, it seemed as if the only thing propping up the British film industry were feature-length versions of popular sitcoms, but while most of these adaptations haven't aged well (assuming they were actually any good in the first place), The Likely Lads emerges as the best of them, sustaining the melancholy humour and finely drawn characters of the original.

Bewes and Bolam are an excellent team, with the aspirational, pretentious Bob frequently being brought down to earth by wounded cynic Terry. They are both nostalgic for their childhoods and years as hard drinking, bird-chasing blokes, and find it difficult to admit they're starting to get on a bit. The mundanity of the modern world gets them down, and they spend their lives either at work, in the pub or in the supermarket.

So they do what happens so often in sitcom movies - they go on holiday (see also Please Sir, Are You Being Served? and the legendary Holiday on the Buses). But this is the great British caravan holiday; it's dull, rainy, boring and generally miserable, summed up by the scene where one night, Terry takes a piss on the side of the caravan and everyone inside can hear it. It's no surprise they'd prefer to be at home.

The jokes are surprisingly good: "I'd offer you a beer, but I've only got six cans", "She's not as pretty as the last one", and even the coarsening of the humour, such as more frank sexual talk and mild swearing ("I couldn't give a shit!"), doesn't seem too out of place. Unfortunately there isn't really enough plot to last the full ninety minutes, and the ending resolves itself into a letdown of a trouserless bedroom farce. But those characters are as great as they were on television, and the downbeat comedy still works like a charm. Music by Mike Hugg (but doesn't include the memorable theme tune of the series).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4953 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Jamie Nichols
Andrew Pragasam
George White
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Mark Scampion
   

 

Last Updated: