HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
   
 
Newest Articles
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
   
 
  Bridge, The Think For A MinuteBuy this film here.
Year: 2006
Director: Eric Steel
Stars: Various
Genre: Documentary
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: San Francisco's world famous Golden Gate Bridge looks idyllic in these shots as the clouds roll by and people, both cityfolk and tourists, make their way across in cars and on foot. But for some of those walking across, the bridge represents a chance to relieve themselves of the problems that have been weighing them down to the point that they cannot face life any more. As we see when one man standing at the railing purposefully climbs over and allows himself to fall. In 2004, there were twenty-four suicides from the bridge and we have just seen one of them, captured on film.

Producer and director Eric Steel's heart may have been in the right place when he made The Bridge, but how ethical was it to film people killing themselves to illustrate his documentary about how the Golden Gate Bridge was the world's most popular suicide spot, as inspired by a New Yorker article on that very subject? He certainly faced a lot of criticism for it, and you can see the point as it was such an invasion of privacy, intruding on these victims' final moments and perhaps encouraging the more susceptible viewers to consider it themselves.

This is the trouble, as when depression hits and the sufferer begins to look for solutions to their problems, problems which seem insurmountable with each passing day, ending it all can certainly cross their minds. As it must have to those we see here, climbing over that railing, or simply toppling over - did Steel wish to put damaging thoughts into the minds of the vulnerable? Was he looking for a sensational angle to his film, or was he seeking to shock potential jumpers into stopping themselves taking drastic action by holding a mirror up to their behaviour?

In effect, the shots of the suicides take up a very small portion of the film. Mainly Steel shows picturesque views of the structure, which rather than romanticising it makes it seem more ominous with every sight of it, and interviews those who knew those who died, building up a picture of the deceased through their reminiscences. He doesn't cover all the people who died on the bridge in 2004, but concentrates on about six of them, with one, a chap called Gene, whose story is returned to throughout the running time until we finally see him kill himself. With all those left behind the emotion is of grief and loss, anger at the waste and for putting them through such trauma, and wondering what they could have done to prevent it. Gene, for example, had a message on his answering machine on the morning he died telling him he had been selected for the job he had been wishing for - had he heard the message? Had he missed it? We'll never know.

But it's not all bad news, as not everyone who jumps, or attempts to take that way out actually dies. One young man leapt off only to survive, he was badly injured, but he lived. In the story he tells there is personal tragedy on the path that led him to such despair, but also absurdity - the woman who asked him to take her picture while he stood at the railing distraught - and a miracle - the seal which kept him afloat as he waited to be rescued. Another scene shows us a photographer who saved a woman's life by literally pulling her up from the brink - but not before he had snapped her climbing over in the first place (he admits his own behaviour seems bizarre to him now, but it draws uncomfortable parallels with Steel's activities). So while you might have qualms about the presentation of the topic, at least the film makes it clear that no matter how suicide may seem the best option at some point, there's always an alternative. And there will always be someone who will miss you if you go. Music by Alex Heffes.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2549 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: