HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
Planet of the Dinosaurs
Gwen
Big Breadwinner Hog
Thunder Road
Moby Dick
Frankenstein's Great Aunt Tillie
Mad Room, The
Phantom of the Megaplex
Night Sitter, The
Child's Play
Power, The
Midsommar
After Midnight
Dolemite is My Name
Varda by Agnes
Toy Story 4
Master Z: Ip Man Legacy
Man Who Never Was, The
Greener Grass
Scobie Malone
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
   
 
Newest Articles
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
   
 
  Pardon My Sarong Island IdiocyBuy this film here.
Year: 1942
Director: Erle C. Kenton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Virginia Bruce, Robert Paige, Lionel Atwill, Leif Erickson, Nan Wynn, William Demarest, Samuel S. Hinds, Marie MacDonald, Elaine Morey, The Ink Spots
Genre: Musical, Comedy
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Bus drivers Algy (Bud Abbott) and Wellington (Lou Costello) have "liberated" their vehicle from their usual city route and are now travelling cross country to Los Angeles. They have passengers consisting of rich playboy Tommy Layton (Robert Paige) and a group of his female admirers and are heading for the coast so that he can set sail on his yacht. Before they reach there, however, they need a full tank of gas and Wellington speeds up so they can reach the nearest service station before their fuel runs out. Little do they know the adventure they have embarked on...

The second biggest Hollywood movie of 1942 after Mrs Miniver, and Abbott and Costello's biggest success of their career to that time, Pardon My Sarong was an attempt to cash in on the hit series of Bing Crosby and Bob Hope Road films. Perhaps that's the reason the script, by True Boardman, John Grant and Nat Perrin (future producer of The Addams Family on the small screen), is so episodic, with a stop-start structure that never really settles into a smooth comedy ride.

Far be it from me to criticise the taste of the American movie-going public at the time, but this wasn't the best Abbott and Costello film either, despite how well it did at the box office. There are some good lines and routines, but they are somewhat lost in a sea of musical numbers and plot contrivances that make it seem as if you're watching an elaborate revue instead of a proper movie. This is especially noticeable because the duo only appear rarely with the musical acts.

There are compensations, though for the first half hour you may be puzzling over that title. Algy and Wellington spend that first third attempting to evade a private detective who has been despatched by their bosses to serve an arrest warrant, but fortunately he's played by William Demarest and proves a reliable foil. There's also the uncommon sight of Abbot having a routine to perform all on his own as he dresses up as a French magician (complete with ridiculous dialogue) to fool the detective and he does pretty well.

But the fellow everybody wanted to see was Costello, and he duly acts up for the benefit of the camera. Abbott always played the bully to his character, but there are a couple of instances where he goes too far even for the over the top antics of these two: Algy eats Wellington's rations and then tries to persuade him to commit suicide when it looks like the yacht they are on is set to drift in the Pacific. It's a bit much, but once they land on a tropical island Algy mellows, it must be the climate.

Uninteresting Tommy has uninteresting romantic scenes with seawoman Joan (Virgina Bruce), but Wellington hits the jackpot when the resident princess expresses an interest in him. Then there's the baddie Lionel Atwill who is after the jewels hidden in the forbidden temple, which ends up with the bizarre sight of Lou Costello brawling with Atwill on a motorboat for the film's climax. Pardon My Sarong is not without interest, and some of it hits the funny bone, but it's a jumble for the most part, with the least convincing South Sea islanders you ever did see (although beautiful princess Nan Wynn could pass for the real thing). There are better Abbott and Costello films out there, even if this one does have a comedy seal in it.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4219 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Erle C. Kenton  (1896 - 1980)

American director who made over 100 films in a 50 year career. Worked as a bit-part actor before making his feature debut in 1919, and was best known for directing comedies, including two of Abbott & Costello’s best films – Pardon My Sarong and Who Done It?. Kenton also proved adept in the horror genre, directing the 1933 classic Island of Lost Souls, with Charles Laughton, as well as House of Dracula, Ghost of Frankenstein and The Cat Creeps. Died from Parkinson's disease in 1980.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: