HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
Shock of the Future, The
Friday
High Life
High Noon
Comes a Horseman
Scandal in Paris, A
Greta
Fight, The
Pink Jungle, The
Skiptrace
Double Date
Mind of Mr. Soames, The
Long Shot
Sherlock Holmes
Amazing Grace
Monitors, The
Memory: The Origins of Alien
Mesa of Lost Women
Banana Splits Movie, The
In Fabric
Sisters Brothers, The
Aniara
Flamingo Kid, The
Queen, The
Avengers: Endgame
Vanishing Act
   
 
Newest Articles
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Genevieve Hawling Like BrooligansBuy this film here.
Year: 1953
Director: Henry Cornelius
Stars: John Gregson, Dinah Sheridan, Kenneth More, Kay Kendall, Geoffrey Keen, Joyce Grenfell, Reginald Beckwith, Arthur Wontner
Genre: Comedy
Rating:  8 (from 2 votes)
Review: A married couple, Alan (John Gregson) and Wendy (Dinah Sheridan), take their vintage car Genevieve on the London to Brighton rally. On the return journey, Alan decides to race his friend Ambrose (Kenneth More) and his new girlfriend Rosalind (Kay Kendall), in their vintage car, back to London.

Genevieve was written by William Rose and has a reputation for being the very epitome of quaint British humour, with its politely feuding couples and love of tradition. But it is in fact an emotional rollercoaster of a movie that puts the four main characters on a journey into the darkness at the heart of their souls.

Well, perhaps that's a slight exaggeration. But it's surprising how many times the two couples lose their tempers - Alan and Wendy's marriage breaks down more often than Genevieve does. Ambrose, played superbly by More, is a terrible man who resembles Mr Toad behind the wheel of his car, with his boorish competitiveness and annoying laugh. When we get into the race in the last half of the movie, the two men become increasingly devious and treacherous, much to the disdain of the long suffering women.

There's actually a love triangle going on here: Wendy is Ambrose's old flame, and Alan's jealousy turns the race into a contest to see who's the better man in Wendy's eyes. There's more steely British determination in this film than there is in The Dambusters and Ice Cold in Alex put together. Of course, Alan shows himself to be a nice guy after all in the scene near the end with the old bloke admiring Genevieve.

If you want to see invention in scriptwriting, look at the number of obstacles Rose comes up with to get in the way of the old cars. The detail is amusing, too: what sounds like a narrator commentating on Alan and Wendy's sex life turns out to be a radio presenter broadcasting from the rally. And notice how all the men at the dance are talking to the women about cars. But the best bit is when the classy Kendall plays the trumpet.

Something you'd never get in a film nowadays is that More has a few pints of beer before beginning his drive. Still, you can see why Genevieve is fondly remembered. Despite the naked aggression on show, it's a warm hearted film really. The distinctive, catchy harmonica music is written and performed by Larry Adler.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5670 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
  Derrick Smith
   

 

Last Updated: