HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Western Stars
League of Gentlemen, The
Higher Power
Shinsengumi
IT Chapter Two
Rich Kids
Arena
Glory Guys, The
Serial Killer's Guide to Life, A
Lovers and Other Strangers
Shiny Shrimps, The
Good Woman is Hard to Find, A
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Doctor at Sea
Spear
Death Cheaters
Wild Rose
Streetwalkin'
Mystify: Michael Hutchence
Devil's Playground, The
Cleanin' Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters
Hustlers
Mega Time Squad
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Souvenir, The
Birds of Passage
Ma
Woman at War
Happy as Lazzaro
Mickey's Christmas Carol
Marriage Story
Santa Claus is a Bastard
Star, The
Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale
Shadow
Christmas Carol, A
Legend of the Demon Cat
Adventures of Sinbad, The
Wounds
Love & Peace
   
 
Newest Articles
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
   
 
  Greta Surrogate BotherBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: Neil Jordan
Stars: Isabelle Huppert, Chloë Grace Moretz, Maika Monroe, Stephen Rea, Colm Feore, Zawe Ashton, Thaddeus Daniels, Raven Dauda, Jeff Hiller, Jane Perry, Jessica Preddy, Navi Dhanoa, Brandon Lee Sears, Parker Sawyers, Elisa Berkeley
Genre: Horror, Thriller
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Frances McCullen (Chloë Grace Moretz) has moved into a New York City apartment with her best friend Erica Penn (Maika Monroe), trying to get away from the bad memories in her native Boston, where she has lost her mother in the past year. She is making ends meet as a waitress in a swanky restaurant, and takes the subway every night, but on one journey she notices a handbag has been left on one of the seats and picks it up. There's nobody in the ticket booth, so she cannot hand it in, so she brings it home with the aim of delivering it to its owner once she finds out who that is. However, she cannot dream of the trouble she will get into by befriending Greta (Isabelle Huppert).

Greta being the owner of said handbag, and very pleased to have it returned, especially when she can make a new pal of Frances in Neil Jordan's second horror movie after a years-long hiatus since his last, the vampire effort Byzantium. This was not a supernatural effort, more a psychological thriller in fact, but the unreal elements were present, either in its adherence to the template of many a shocker that came before it, or in the manner in which the plot grew ever more outlandish, to the point where you could justifiably wonder if the whole affair was a spoof or not. The thing was, it appeared that it was all right to laugh at the film, even positively encouraged in places.

Really this was a trashy thriller made by smart people, which meant a hoary old set of plottings and performances and direction that exhibited more dedication than perhaps the material deserved but was welcome anyway. If you had seen those nineteen-nineties paranoid chillers where seemingly friendly folks turned out to be dangerous lunatics, thus enabling the viewers, never mind the characters, to be smug in the conviction that they were right to be as suspicious as humanly possible of their neighbours, their colleagues and even the person who might appear to be decent enough friend material but was actually a wolf in sheep's clothing, then you would know the territory well.

Of course, such behaviour was happening in real life, it was not a genre inspired solely by the success of stuff like The Stepfather and Misery, and that paranoia came to define the following century in a manner that the nineties laid the groundwork for, what with the rise of the internet and social media providing ample opportunities for an army of stalkers to follow the object of their obsession without even needing to leave their houses. This unhealthy interest in precisely what other people were getting up to behind closed doors was assisted by those self-same people being only too happy to share precisely that information via photographs and videos posted online; though we see Greta feasting on Frances's profile, she has been going about stalking the hard way.

It is no spoiler to reveal that Greta has designs on her innocent prey, her Old World European grimness more than a match for Frances's New World innocence, and amusingly ridiculous details such as the famously French star not actually being French (!) were paid off in punchlines both throwaway and more important to the narrative. You could judge this sort of horror as being beneath the cast, but in light of the dedication they went about their roles, Huppert having a ball as an absolute nutter and Moretz her easily snared and toyed-with victim bringing just the right level of vulnerability so you could believe she would not be aware of the terrible choices she made to keep attracting the maniac, you would be glad they did. Many a respected thespian let their hair down in a genre movie, and that only increased their popularity: you could imagine Huppert, Moretz and Monroe gaining new fans as a result of this and films like it. If nothing else, it proved the twenty-first century was where it was best to keep yourself to yourself, the fear being that may still not be enough to repel the psychos. Music by Javier Navarrete.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 236 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: