HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
That Most Important Thing: Love
Man on the Run
First Love
Countess from Hong Kong, A
Storm Boy
Storm Boy
Frozen II
White Sheik, The
Whalebone Box, The
Hunt, The
Invisible Man, The
Honey Boy
System Crasher
Judy & Punch
Bacurau
Battling Butler
Vivarium
Seven Chances
Dogs Don't Wear Pants
Navigator, The
Knives Out
Hit!
Charlie's Angels
Passport to Shame
Le Mans '66
Keep Fit
Doctor Sleep
Friend or Foe
Brass Target
Mine and the Minotaur, The
Sky Pirates
Syncopation
Sea Children, The
Ghost of a Chance, A
Go Kart Go
Great Buster, The
Seventy Deadly Pills
Wings of Mystery
Treasure at the Mill
VFW
   
 
Newest Articles
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
   
 
  Razorback Big Pig
Year: 1984
Director: Russell Mulcahy
Stars: Gregory Harrison, Arkie Whiteley, Bill Kerr, Chris Haywood, David Argue, Judy Morris, John Ewart, John Howard, Don Smith, Mervyn Drake
Genre: HorrorBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Jake (Bill Kerr) is putting his grandson to bed in his home in the Australian Outback when he is disturbed by a noise from outside. Grabbing his rifle, he goes to investigate when suddenly a huge boar appears from the darkness and smashes into the house, barging through and taking the child with it. There is a court case because nobody believes Jake's story, but there's not enough evidence to convict him. Move forward two years and American reporter Beth Winters (Judy Morris) is sent to the area of the Outback where Jake lives, looking for details on the extermination of the kangaroo population for the pet food trade, but she finds more than she bargained for...

Russell Mulcahy will forever be known as the former director of music videos, and more specifically the former director of Duran Duran videos (guess which band blares from Beth's radio?). Razorback, his first feature for the cinema, did nothing to dispel the style over substance accusations, but at least the film was easy on the eye and moved along at a decent pace - for a horror movie it looked a lot slicker than a lot of the similar product around at the time. It was written by Everett de Roche from Peter Brennan's novel, and while it started out as a cheeky variation on the infamous Dingo Baby Case, it quickly settled into an Australian Jaws.

If Jaws were a ginormous boar, that is. There's another influence here, and that's Psycho because of what happens to Beth about a day after arriving in the small town with her cameraman. The locals are suspicious, in more ways than one, at her intentions to expose the pet food factory's dubious methods, a factory run by two brothers, Benny (Chris Haywood) and Dicko (David Argue) Baker, who don't take kindly to Beth's manner of showing up and secretly filming their operations. In fact, they dislike her so much that they run her car off the road at night and, in one of the nastiest scenes, threaten to rape her.

However, something stops them, something large and with tusks that rams their Mad Max 2 lookalike truck and sends them packing. Beth isn't so lucky, and effectively disappears so that soon after her newlywed husband Carl (Gregory Harrison) follows her to discover what he can about her predicament. In the grand tradition of importing American stars for non-American films (although Carl claims to be Canadian, we're not fooled), Harrison proves to be a convincing fish out of water, but a bland presence overall, with the Australians out acting him, although to be fair they have more (boorish?) character eccentricities to work with.

There may be the by now well-worn ecological theme with its monster taking its revenge on behalf of nature, but this is the most half-hearted aspect of Razorback. The film is more intrigued by the alien nature of the landscape - it looks like planet Mars in many shots, as the dream-delirium sequence demonstrates - and how paradoxically alluring and repellent it can be. What this means is a host of carefully filmed views mixed with the rough talking locals for colour. A strange combination of the glossy and grimy, what really lets it down is the obviously immobile giant boar model, which might as well be a Volkswagen Beetle for all the menace it projects. Still, Mulcahy's eye for the scenery is a bonus and the film works up a fair amount of tension. Music by Iva Davies.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6648 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Russell Mulcahy  (1953 - )

Australian director with a flashy visual style. A former music video director - most notably for Duran Duran - Mulcahy made an impact in 1984 with his first real film, the Outback creature feature Razorback. 1986's fantasy thriller Highlander was a big cult hit, and its success led to a foray in Hollywood in the 1990s, which included thrillers Ricochet and The Real McCoy, the superhero yarn The Shadow and the sequel Highlander II: The Quickening. Subsequent work has largely been in TV.

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: