HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Kindergarten Teacher, The
Carne
Penny Slinger: Out of the Shadows
Girls Town
Burning
Hitchhikers, The
For All Mankind
Glass Key, The
Captor, The
Hide in Plain Sight
Wildlife
X2
Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese
Heiress, The
Cold Pursuit
Firestorm
Dogs of War, The
Holy Mountain, The
Piercing
Under Fire
Jennifer on My Mind
People on Sunday
Lethal Weapon 4
Downhill Racer
Emily
Odette
Escape Room
Across the Pacific
Madeline's Madeline
You're Gonna Miss Me
Iron Sky: The Coming Race
Derby
Mortal Engines
Union City
Knife+Heart
Little Stranger, The
Sauvage
Watermelon Man
Wandering Earth, The
Good Fairy, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Woo's the Boss: Last Hurrah for Chivalry & Hand of Death on Blu-ray
Get Ahead in Showbiz: Expresso Bongo and It's All Happening
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
   
 
  White Chamber Torturous AnalogiesBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: Paul Raschid
Stars: Shauna Macdonald, Oded Fehr, Amrita Acharia, Sharon Maughan, Nicholas Farrell, Candis Nergaard
Genre: Horror, Science Fiction
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: This is The United Kingdom - soon, where a civil war is raging as a result of violent opposition to a weak, yet oppressive government, leaving a power vacuum that terrorists could step in to fill. As the battles wage outside, in this room a woman (Shauna Macdonald) wakes up and finds there are no doors or windows to be seen, it is pure white aside from the bars that support the roof. Basically, there is no way out and she is at the mercy of whoever has placed her inside, who turns out to be the owner of the distorted voice who begins to interrogate her. She insists she was merely the admin girl in this facility and cannot help, but the voice is insistent too... very insistent.

This was one of those science fiction dramas that set out to warn you in its premise that the authorities wanted to kill you, then proceeded to show you how over the course of the running time. This was somewhat different in that it also illustrated how the rebel forces probably wanted to kill you as well, so you could regard a political balance to the message, or more likely, a sense of confusion born of writer and director Paul Raschid not wishing to tip too far in one direction or the other. What was clear was that he was against oppression in all its forms, and illustrated it could be used in more than one way, by more than one political movement, to achieve its goals.

White Chamber was also one of those science fiction movies which made the most of its limited sets: yes, we were in Cube territory once again, where one set was repurposed again and again, though this time it was supposed to be a single location from beginning to end. We spend the first twenty minutes or so in that titular chamber watching the woman subjected to various tortures, for another unwritten rule was that if stuck in a confined space, any character therein would be suffering some kind of ordeal, so this was as much a horror flick as it was a sci-fi effort, again, a very recognisable trope from the world of low budget genre movies dabbling in more than one technique.

Macdonald had proven her worth in the portrayal of brittle but driven characters before, so this was not really anything new for her as far as performance went, yet she had been hired for a reason, and she gave this her all, especially after the twist happened early and we flashed back five days to find out how she got where she was and what the scientists who devised the chamber had been up to. True, it was mad scientist territory once more, with the cliché murderous boffins devising a new drug for military use, but once you scratched the surface not much that Bela Lugosi or Lionel Atwill had not been indulging in back in the nineteen-thirties. What was different were the pretensions to social commentary, which here served as a spine for the plot even if it played out in practice as rather vague.

There was a small cast at work here, but they were all well applied, in particular Oded Fehr as a freedom fighter/terrorist who has been in the torture chamber and experimented on like a lab rat. The point that remote observation, here in a laboratory, but just as easily applied to an audience watching on television or online, dehumanised both the observer and the observed was a valid one, especially in a world where citizens were increasingly interacting with one another through screens, but again, the genre had been telling us stuff like this since the sixties, before that even, so this was not as fresh as it liked to think. The tone was clinical, a shade smug in places, but it did score its points on how politics can divide just as easily as it can unite with needling precision, and by the conclusion you may not have been one hundred percent sure who Raschid was siding with in light of how both used the worst possible methods to succeed in a probably unwinnable conflict. Not a barrel of laughs, but it did have a brain in its head. Music by John Harle.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 113 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Rachel Franke
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Paul Shrimpton
Darren Jones
George White
   

 

Last Updated: