HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
Astronaut
Peanut Butter Falcon, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Dave Made a Maze Cardboard Boxed In
Year: 2017
Director: Bill Watterson
Stars: Meera Rohit Khumbani, Nick Thune, Adam Busch, James Urbaniak, Frank Caeti, Scott Narver, Stephanie Allynne, Kirsten Vangsness, Scott Krinsky, Timothy Nordwind, John Hennigan, Rick Overton, Kamilla Alnes, Drew Knigga
Genre: Horror, Comedy, Weirdo, FantasyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Annie (Meera Rohit Khumbani) returns home from abroad to find her boyfriend Dave (Nick Thune) isn't there. What is there is a collection of cardboard in the middle of their living room floor - but it turns out Dave is inside. She asks him what he is doing, and he tells her he grew bored while she was away and so he built a maze out of cardboard, in which he is now trapped. She tells him to stop being silly, but when she tries opening the boxes, he yells at her to stop, for the construction is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside, and if she sends it crashing down it will kill him. Therefore Annie has a dilemma, one she tries to solve by inviting a bunch of people over...

Very much a hipster epic, to the extent that it lasts eighty minutes long and features a Michel Gondry-lite appearance, Dave Made a Maze created some buzz when it was released to film festivals and quickly became a cult movie. This was more or less justified, as it channelled the kind of humour of British weirdo sitcom The Mighty Boosh (another hipster favourite) with its DIY aesthetic into a highly inventive series of scenes that were mainly held together by the presence of cardboard, which appeared in every scene, just about every shot in fact, and crafted an indelible look for what were some pretty cool shenanigans of the sort that used to be termed "pseudo-intellectual".

Not a phrase you hear very often post-nineties, but Dave's issues in the real world where he is part of a generation that are stuck without a satisfying career or set of relationships, leading them further into themselves and their own minds to the point of self-obsession, have manifested themselves in the maze. Which is actually a labyrinth, as his pal Gordon (Adam Busch), is fond of pointing out, as a collection of his acquaintances ignore Dave's warnings not to enter the thing and are initially enchanted. Or they are until it is apparent he wanted it to be authentic, so has not only laced it with booby traps, but also has generated a flesh-eating Minotaur which roams the rooms and corridors.

After all, what's a labyrinth without a Minotaur? There was more, and as inventive as its director Bill Watterson could manufacture it on an admittedly substantial reserve of inspiration, even if this came across as a concept for computer gaming more than it did a narrative film. Such was fantasy storytelling in the twenty-first century, though technically this was more of a horror as people were killed by the maze, dispatched in cartoonishly gory methods as their innards are represented by sprays of silly string, ribbons or scraps of paper. Really, the only truly creepy scenes were with another pal, Brynne (Stephanie Allynne) who has been devoured and refashioned as a cardboard puppet endlessly requesting high fives in a chirpy, sing-song voice.

That said, the main six characters turned into puppets too, but cute ones, and they turned back into humans. They consisted of Dave, Annie, Gordon and a three-man camera crew, for a pertinent point about the subject of their generation's preoccupation with recording everything they do despite it not being of any interest to anyone else (except a stalker, perhaps). Here, the director of the film within the film may have a point too, in that this would have been genuinely worth capturing for posterity as there was very little like it in reality, never mind the world of fiction. The dialogue verged on the smartassed, and we were watching people with very little self-awareness outside their own bubble which left us with the position of being aware for them (or of them), but Annie grounded it as while she could be caught up in the oddities, she remained the sole sensible voice, maybe a cliché in bro comedy, but necessary, even in the weirdo kind. Music by Mondo Boys (and a track by The Equals over the titles was a great rediscovery).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 454 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: