HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Gangster, the Cop, the Devil, The
Brightburn
Satanic Panic
Claudine
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Sharkwater Extinction Men Eating SharksBuy this film here.
Year: 2018
Director: Rob Stewart
Stars: Rob Stewart, Will Allen, Brock Cahill, Regi Domingo, Madison Stewart, Ryan Walton
Genre: Documentary
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: The global shark population is in crisis, as its numbers have dwindled at extreme rates over the course of the past three decades. The reason for this is not because of disease, or another predator of the oceans devouring them, it is because of humanity, or certain elements of us who insist on eating the creatures in enormous volume. Despite many countries banning shark fishing, they do not necessarily ban imports of the meat - shark fin soup is considered a delicacy - and the trade is fuelled by criminal organisations who harvest the fish, resulting in their near-extinction; this can be reversed if one photographer and campaigner can get the message out about this awful situation.

Sadly, that one campaigner was Rob Stewart, the director of this documentary, who did not live to see it completed. With filming almost over on this, effectively his third shark film, he suffered a diving accident which killed him, a fact that was not milked by this effort, as it abided by Rob's wishes and placed the plight of the sharks front and centre. Indeed, though his death was well-publicised in 2017 it is not mentioned until the last ten minutes or so of this, which preferred to mix startlingly beautiful footage of the fish in question with far more brutal imagery of them captured, chopped up and packed into refrigerated containers to be shipped around the world.

More than once Stewart points out that in the last thirty years previous to this film, shark populations had been reduced by ninety percent, and all because of a culture that saw eating them as a desirable, weirdly macho pursuit. Yes, sharks are the apex predator of the seas, but for a person to eat them puts the creatures in their place, and that bullshit attitude was ruining the oceans, not least because a healthy ecosystem desperately needs them to exist to feed across the globe. Another thing highlighted was that pollution was rife in the water, and that affected the sharks as well, not to mentioning poisoning the meat that they were made into with such toxic elements as lead.

Therefore it was by far in our best interests not to catch and slaughter sharks, yet there was so much money in the trade, billions of dollars we are told, that there were too many not understanding the extent of the harm they were carrying out by funding said trade. And worse, there were those well aware of the damage they were doing but did it anyway out of sheer greed: the common twenty-first century narrative of humankind walking willingly off a cliff because they did not like to be told what to do, or even that they were seriously wrong, was present and correct in Sharkwater Extinction. The idea that it was only the Chinese consuming sharks was blown out of the water as well: if you eat fish, you may be eating mislabelled shark anyway, without being aware of it.

Shark is also in pet food, livestock feed, even cosmetics, which begins to put into perspective the degree of how dire the crisis was without many in the world being aware of it. Stewart made it his mission in life to change all that, as after all if the demand falls away, the supply will no longer be needed, and the shark numbers will begin to increase. He remained optimistic, though, as it was his experience that once people were told about what was happening, not solely with sharks but with the whole environment, they tended to do something about it to improve things: especially kids, whose future was looking perilous if the huge danger to ecology was not addressed. This was not a particularly brilliantly made documentary, Stewart's obvious skill with recording the sea life excepted, but its message was so sincere, so important, that it was well worth watching and talking about, not merely to pay tribute to its goodhearted creator, but to make sure we as the human race didn't end up as dead as he was. Music by Jonathan Goldsmith.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 261 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: