HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
Astronaut
Peanut Butter Falcon, The
Ip Man 4: The Finale
Card, The
   
 
Newest Articles
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
   
 
  Mister Deathman In Dire Need Of A Theme Song
Year: 1977
Director: Michael D. Moore
Stars: David Broadnax, Stella Stevens, Arthur Brauss, Lena Farugia, Brian O'Shaughnessy, Ian Hamilton, Len Sparrowhawk, Bill Curry, Ronald France, Larry Taylor, Ian Yule, Ken Gampu, Gordon Mulholland, Marius Weyers, Victor Melleny, Myra Shelton
Genre: Action, Trash, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  3 (from 1 vote)
Review: Special Agent Geoffrey Graves (David Broadnax) has just received an offer from a Colonel to do a job for him, but he has turned him down without even asking what it entailed because he has decided recently he has retired. However, on walking away from the office where the meeting took place, he is accosted by a couple of goons working for the organisation he was supposed to be investigating, and they attack him in the underground car park of the building. They leave him for unconscious, but he tracks them to the elevator and stalls it between floors, then attacks them back with a fire extinguisher - you can't keep a good man down.

David Broadnax only really had two films to his name, this would-be James Bond rip-off and Zombie Island Massacre in the following decade which wasn't much better than this bargain basement affair, but he gave it a try and had a leading role, devised by himself, in this no matter how shoddy it was. Curiously, though it aped the blaxploitation efforts of the earlier nineteen-seventies, it was a South African film, meaning you worry for the African American leading man more when he was, say on a whites-only beach for a scene than you would had he been making the same story in the United States or Europe.

Anywhere that didn't have the fascist South African government's policy of apartheid in place, which you would have thought would hamper any attempts to make a movie that had a black superman in what one supposed was the title role, especially when he makes quick work of beating up the honkies and even executing them if need be. Possibly this was allowed because that nation's film industry was so desperate for custom that they would turn a blind eye to Broadnax's ethnicity, or possibly this production was done on the cheap, so were turning their own blind eyes to the authorities' practices and campaigns of violence.

Whichever, it was more interesting than watching Mister Deathman, an item that featured action and adventure yet merely the barest minimum of excitement. Not helping was Graves' vulnerability, which took the form of him getting either knocked out or kidnapped - or both - every ten to fifteen minutes, which did not exactly bolster your faith in him as an agent of any great aptitude. I mean, he doesn't get caught in a net once, it happens twice, which was twice too many if we were intended to be filled with admiration for this fine figure of a man who it transpired was about as good at his job as an agent in a 007 spoof would have been. He didn't even get a roster of snappy lines to fire off, surprising when it was Broadnax who had a hand in actually writing the thing.

The plot, assuming you could follow it, had Graves travelling to Africa much as Shaft had in recent memory to get back a file of secret plans for a space shuttle of some description (the real one was in the news in the late seventies, for good, optimistic, reasons rather than bad), which has something to do with a kidnapped scientist. But it resembled more a succession of bits and pieces that looked as if they should have been connected in some way, but good luck working out how - Stella Stevens, closest person this had to a star in the cast, showed up halfway through as a mistress of a coterie of what appeared to be secretaries, though what she needed a riding crop for was another mystery, and the scenes she shared with Broadnax hinted at what might have been, they generated a couple of sparks. Otherwise, the most notable element was (spoiler) the big bad villain was not a human but a supercomputer which didn't have the decency to so much as explode at the climax, though other things did. Strictly for Bondage completists.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 801 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: