HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese
Heiress, The
Cold Pursuit
Firestorm
Dogs of War, The
Holy Mountain, The
Piercing
Under Fire
Jennifer on My Mind
People on Sunday
Lethal Weapon 4
Downhill Racer
Emily
Odette
Escape Room
Across the Pacific
Madeline's Madeline
You're Gonna Miss Me
Iron Sky: The Coming Race
Derby
Mortal Engines
Union City
Knife+Heart
Little Stranger, The
Sauvage
Watermelon Man
Wandering Earth, The
Good Fairy, The
Killer Party
Holmes & Watson
Monster in the Closet
Sand, The
Glass
My Brilliant Career
Knife for the Ladies, A
Man in the Attic
Destroyer
Fillmore
Bumblebee
No Kidding
   
 
Newest Articles
Outer Space and Outta Sight: Gonks Go Beat on Blu-ray
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
How 1970s Can You Get? Cliff Richard in Take Me High vs Never Too Young to Rock
A Perfect Engine, An Eating Machine: The Jaws Series
   
 
  Blue-Eyed Bandit, The Undone by his own sex appealBuy this film here.
Year: 1980
Director: Alfredo Gianetti
Stars: Franco Nero, Dalilah Di Lazzaro, Carlos de Carvalho, Pier Francesco Poggi, Luigi Montini, Sergio Tabor, Paolo Maria Scalondro, Jole Fierro, Fabrizio Bentivoglio, Franco Javarone, Mickey Knox
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Thriller
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Quiet, unassuming Renzo Dominici (Franco Nero) is a crippled old accountant at a large bank firm who maintains a strict routine. He arrives early each day. Works diligently. Knows every inch of the business. Tries very hard not to succumb to the flirtatious advances of Stella (Dalilah Di Lazzaro) the sexy young nymphomaniac who works in the cafeteria. And is always last to leave. All because in reality Renzo is a dashing young thief in disguise plotting a major heist. Yet when Renzo finally pulls off his meticulously planned robbery not everything goes according to plan. A few witnesses catch a glimpse of his distinctively dreamy blue eyes.

Franco Nero was the biggest star associated with Italian crime thrillers and probably the best actor. Partly because rather than recycle the same hard-boiled persona in film after film, like say Maurizio Merli or Henry Silva, he played a variety of characters. His talents are well served by The Blue-Eyed Bandit which for the most part downplays the usual sordid thrills in favour of a psychological character study. Aspects of the plot bear comparison with the superior Elliot Gould vehicle The Silent Partner (1978), among the finest crime thrillers of the Seventies, albeit with a slightly lighter tone to its first two acts.

Alfredo Giannetti, who won an Oscar for co-writing Divorce, Italian Style (1961), was largely active in comedy and social drama although he also penned another Franco Nero vehicle: The Shark Hunter (1979). His comedy background is evident in the script with its wry observations about office life and bawdy banter. Indeed the subplot concerning Stella's amorous liaisons with a horny co-worker (Pier Francesco Poggi) are straight out of an Italian sex farce. Yet the film skilfully interweaves this and a few other seemingly frivolous threads into the suspenseful heist story. Plus more of Dalilah Di Lazzaro, hitherto cinema's sexiest Frankenstein monster in Andy Warhol's Flesh for Frankenstein (1973), is always a good thing. The former model displays a largely untapped flair for light comedy. In a charming touch Stella finds Renzo sexy even under his balding wig and old man makeup, before the plot takes a darker turn.

For all Renzo's meticulous planning the robbery goes awry in a rather mundane yet thoroughly believable way. It forces him to contend with several obstacles including nosy Stella and her sleazy boss (Sergio Tabor). There are also a suspicious security guard (Franco Javarone) and a gay hustler named Rick (Fabrizio Bentivoglio) whose life Renzo spared earlier when he caught him trying to steal his wallet. All the while the cops are on Renzo's trail. The subplot wherein Renzo's rejection of Rick drives the latter to seek vengeance, hunting him down by the smell of his aftershave (!) adds a problematic layer of homophobia sadly symptomatic of Italian crime thrillers at the time. To the film's credit it draws parallels between Renzo and the supporting cast who are all similarly looking to escape sad, unfulfilling lives. Ultimately money is less important to Renzo than freedom. The Blue-Eyed Bandit humanizes its calculating criminal anti-hero through sentimental flashbacks to his poverty-stricken youth and a strained relationship with his senile, hospital-bound mother.

The third act cranks up the suspense and even turns a little nasty as Renzo starts bumping off witnesses one by one, torn between desperation and his own nagging conscience. Franco's azure-eyed charisma and Giannetti's humane writing keep him relatively sympathetic even though his actions grow increasingly ruthless, even cruel. Music by Ennio Morricone in jazz-piano mode.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 537 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Rachel Franke
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
  Derrick Smith
Paul Shrimpton
Darren Jones
George White
   

 

Last Updated: