HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
Astronaut
Peanut Butter Falcon, The
   
 
Newest Articles
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
   
 
  Money Train Season's Beatings
Year: 1995
Director: Joseph Ruben
Stars: Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Jennifer Lopez, Robert Blake, Chris Cooper, Joe Grifasi, Scott Sowers, Skipp Sudduth, Vincent Laresca, Nelson Vasquez, Vincent Patrick, Aida Turturro, Alvaleta Guess, Vincent Pastore, David Tawil, José Zúñiga, Bill Nunn
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: It's Christmas time in New York, and as night has fallen, the festive lights are lit around the city with the cold biting those braving the weather, including one drunk who stumbles down onto the subway and collapses onto a bench, mumbling a carol until he passes out. But he's not actually a drunk, he is an undercover police officer who is posing as a drunk to snare anyone who would seek to rob someone incapacitated in such a way, and his partner is watching from a concealed hideaway to leap into action. They are in fact brothers, John (Wesley Snipes) and Charlie Robinson (Woody Harrelson), foster brothers that is, and one of them is wilder than the other...

One of those Christmas movies that's handy to carry over to New Year as well, since it's midnight on New Year's Eve that the plot ends up at, Money Train was originally a reasonably anticipated reteaming of Snipes and Harrelson after the hit comedy White Men Can't Jump. It's a mark of how difficult it can be to find a decent vehicle to pair two stars in when you see that this was nowhere near as good, and that they were never paired again as the stars of their own would-be blockbuster, for nothing here really settled or seemed fitting, it was more of a thrown together bunch of thriller movie parts with a smattering of comedy that was beneath the actors, and some buddy flick bonding.

It was a buddy movie at heart, it had to be said, yet the rapport that Ron Shelton had brought out in them was missing in action here under the direction of Joseph Ruben, no stranger to the thriller genre but failing to get a grasp on what would have succeeded. It was indicative of how all over the place Money Train was that a subplot about a firebug serial killer (Chris Cooper) trying to incinerate ticket booth operators could have made a perfectly fair main plot, but here was simply added to beef up the running time because it was clear they did not have enough story for a whole two-hour production, and were reduced to adding random bits of not very exciting action to have something on the screen.

Never a good way to go about a work with suspense and spectacle at its supposed heart, but the money train of the title, a vehicle that carries the cash gathered from the day's fares, did not feature a tremendous amount either, not until the last act where all Charlie's mutterings about divining a method of robbing the thing came to fruition. Yes, it was yet another nineties heist movie, that most beloved subgenre of crime drama of this decade where just when you thought you had seen every variation possible along would come some other variation on liberating the riches from a bank vault, or a casino, or an armoured car, or whatever else they could wring out of a severely overplayed hand. In this case, that would be The Taking of Pelham One Two Three and that last confrontation in Speed.

But before we got there, a lot of half-hearted footering about was on offer, presented with a festive appearance the film proceeded to do absolutely nothing with, but made it a middling bet if you wanted a Christmas action movie that wasn't Die Hard and you were really desperate for that combination in one package. Jennifer Lopez was the love interest in a triangle with Snipes and Harrelson, another cop who charms them both and because this was early in her career had a naked love scene with Snipes, as she didn't have enough clout for a no nudity clause in her contract, but there was precious little else to her character than that, acting as cheerleader for them both and present as the most perfunctory of decoration. The soul of the piece was intended to be this conflict between the two brothers, but that chemistry they had before evaporated here, leaving easy to watch but easier to forget malarkey, and Robert Blake doing his best to steal the picture as the asshole supervisor which justified the lawbreaking (according to this, if your boss is obnoxious, it's fine to steal from him and attack him - merry Christmas!). Music by Mark Mancina.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1076 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: