HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn
Gentlemen Broncos
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Morgan A.I. Aieee!
Year: 2016
Director: Luke Scott
Stars: Kate Mara, Anya Taylor-Joy, Rose Leslie, Michael Yare, Toby Jones, Chris Sullivan, Boyd Holbrook, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Paul Giamatti, Vinette Robinson, Brian Cox, Crispian Belfrage, Amybeth McNulty, Jonathan Aris, Charlotte Asprey
Genre: Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: There has been an accident at this top secret research laboratory, situated out in the middle of the countryside in a large mansion house, and the corporation that has been in charge of the programme has dispatched a risk assessment officer, Lee Weathers (Kate Mara), to find out what went wrong. And more importantly, whether it is worth continuing with the research when there is a possibility it could go so wrong, even to the point of harming human life, not the best state of affairs for a working environment. But the programme is not a machine, or a new drug, it is a person: Morgan (Anya Taylor-Joy), short for "modified organism", a person grown in the lab as a new form of life...

It turns out audiences had had their fill of movies concerning science gone horribly wrong when this was released, for despite a starry cast it underperformed drastically at the box office when it came across as cold and unappealing. Much like Lee herself, who is a very no-nonsense, just the facts personality, and not much of a hook to hang the story around until you were privy to the reason why she has become so ruthlessly efficient in her job, by which time it was too late to engage much interest. It was the debut feature from Luke Scott, who like his sister was given the chance to helm a film by their father after some time spent assisting in his productions, he being Ridley Scott, again pursuing his interest in science fiction.

Ridley Scott had increasingly turned to the realms of fantastique as his career had reached its autumn years, both as producer and director, and this was very much in that vein of efforts that preferred to take a high concept in that arena, one that had been much explored by classic authors in the genre, and deliver an entertainment constructed around it. But that was part of the trouble, we had seen it all before, and there was absolutely no surprise in Morgan the character's behaviour once the plot drew closer to its denouement since she was simply doing what umpteen artificial lifeforms had done for decades in the format: go berserk when she cannot understand this humanity ordering her about, refusing to comply with her creators.

It was there in Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, this punishment of mankind for meddling in God Almighty's domain, and here for the umpteenth time it was again, no matter that Morgan's overseers are a kindly bunch often played by famous faces, as if no matter how well-intentioned you were, crafting an artificial intelligence was always going to turn around and bite you. What she has done as the film opens is attack one of her handlers (Jennifer Jason Leigh, hardly in this), and now Lee must divine if this will happen again or if Morgan will behave herself from now on - perhaps, though this is barely admitted to the boffins, see if this propensity for violence could be harnessed for a use in the outside world, probably military in purpose. The point appeared to be that a bad upbringing will have bad repercussions.

After all, Morgan has been confined to what amounts to a cell where she may get to play her music and play her games, but it's a limited existence that one so aspiring to be human will feel thwarted by. Cue many scenes reminiscent of Will Graham's conversations with Hannibal Lector in Michael Mann's Manhunter (Brian Cox showed up in a tiny role, too) where characters interrogate Morgan to find out where she has gone wrong, Paul Giamatti's investigator the prime idiot who pushes her over the edge after insisting on meeting with her without the clear Perspex barrier between them. After that, robogirl cut a swathe through the cast as she tried to attain her freedom, curiously similar to the much-maligned (and admittedly ridiculous) Species II as she notably manages to drive a car at one point. This was all building to a twist that you may or may not see coming, but if you didn't it still was a letdown as it threw the potential for philosophical questions away in favour of bloodshed and pessimism without sufficient purpose. Luke Scott showed promise, it was well enough delivered, but my it was hackneyed. Music by Max Richter.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1352 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: