HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Lodgers, The
Eagle vs Shark
American Assassin
Die, Mommie, Die!
All the Money in the World
Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, The
Black Panther
Children's Hour, The
Mayhem
Sphere
Guyver, The
Night School
Loveless
Ragtime
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters
Murders in the Rue Morgue
Wound, The
Scalawag
Let's Get Harry
Girl with Green Eyes
Sunchaser, The
Tom Jones
Downsizing
Defiant Ones, The
Centerfold Girls, The
Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, The
120 BPM (Beats Per Minute)
Police Academy 3: Back in Training
Safe Place, A
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning
   
 
Newest Articles
Bad Taste from Outer Space: Galaxy of Terror and Xtro
A Yen for the 1990s: Iron Monkey and Satan Returns
Hey, Punk: Jubilee and Rock 'n' Roll High School
Help! with The Knack: Richard Lester in 1965
Roll Up, Get Yer Free Cinema: The Shorts on the BFI Woodfall Blu-rays
Time for Heroes: The Dam Busters and How I Won the War
Hell is a City: Midnight Cowboy and Taxi Driver
Boris Goes Bonkers, Bela Goes Bats: The Old Dark House and Mark of the Vampire
Charles Bronson's Mid-70s: Breakheart Pass and Others
Kids in America: The Breakfast Club vs Metropolitan
80s Dance-Off: Staying Alive vs Murder-Rock vs Breakin'
The Cinematic Darkside of Donald Crowhurst
Dutch Courage: The Flodder Series
Coming of Age: Boys on Film 18 - Heroes on DVD
Country and Irish - The secret history of Irish pop culture
   
 
  Misconduct The Commitment That Says, Don't Worry, Nobody Will Watch This AnywayBuy this film here.
Year: 2016
Director: Shintaro Shimosawa
Stars: Josh Duhamel, Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Alice Eve, Malin Akerman, Lee Byung-hun, Julia Stiles, Glen Powell, Marcus Lyle Brown, Leah McKendrick, Chris Marquette, Skye P. Marshall, Gregory Alan Williams, Jason Hill, Nathan Moore, Chris J. Fanguy
Genre: Drama, Thriller
Rating:  2 (from 1 vote)
Review: Arthur Denning (Anthony Hopkins) is a multi-millionaire owner of a pharmaceuticals company that has recently been the subject of controversy when it was alleged that a drugs trial they conducted led to the deaths of over two hundred people. But this is like water off a duck's back for him, he's too rich to care, though he does have some interests other than money that stir him, such as the woman he is seeing, Emily Hynes (Malin Akerman). However, the last time he saw her they had an argument, and now he is looking at his phone and seeing a photograph of her with a bruised face and a message demanding a ransom be paid. Will he stand for this, or will he make his own plans to get even?

It really doesn't matter one way or the other considering how Misconduct turned out, possibly the biggest flop in the careers of not only Anthony Hopkins but Al Pacino as well. You will search in vain for a shot that featured them simultaneously, so you were not even offered the thrill of watching these two heavyweights verbally spar electrifyingly for the first time, yet that was not the movie's biggest crime. More egregious was that it set itself up as a tale of intrigue and passion, but could barely muster the quality threshold of Animal Instincts II, in spite of securing a cinema release on the strength of the aforementioned ageing alpha male stars. That release infamously could not break the hundred quid mark in the United Kingdom.

All of which designated it as one of 2016's biggest turkeys, worse still than some of the junk Hopkins and Pacino had been churning out in their Autumn years simply to earn a paycheque with the minimum of effort. Well, maybe not the minimum: Anthony punched out a bit part actor (as part of the plot) and Al got to try out his Southern gentleman accent, which made him sound like a subdued and contemplative Foghorn Leghorn, but other than that the drama was carried by the less famous cast members. Even so, it's not as if they were rank amateurs, most of the main actors had a good few credits to their name where they had proven themselves capable of delivering lines with conviction, so what went wrong here?

Why did everyone in this behave like Martians, with only a glancing recognition as to how real people carried themselves? Was it the direction from Shintaro Shimosawa, whose camera frequently lost interest in the action on the screen and would start drifting away from characters as they were talking, or not include them in the frame at all as the hapless thespian delivered their lines? Or was it those lines themselves, which the actors utterly failed to bring to any form of convincing life, probably because they had read the screenplay and were as baffled as to the motivations of anyone in it as the unfortunates who took a chance on watching it? Not to mention Federico Jusid's music that sounded like it had been stolen from a different movie. The more you tried to work out why any of it happened, twists especially, the less sense it made, a computer program would have concocted a better set of logical events.

As far as it was possible to surmise, Emily tries to seduce an old flame, Ben Cahill (Josh Duhamel), to embroil him in the plot to expose Denning's corruption at his business, apparently because the authorities don't bother with investigating sudden mass death when there are corporations involved, but Ben is a married lawyer whose spouse Charlotte (Alice Eve) is a harassed doctor at the local hospital. The manner of dragging her into the conspiracy at the last minute was such an insult to the intelligence, not to mention a lift from an actual blockbuster of twenty-five years before, that if you made it that far without developing a constant frown of bafflement you deserved an award for bravery. Also showing up were Julia Stiles as a tough security expert who proves swearing is not her forte, and most confounding of all, Lee Byung-hun as a motorcycle-riding assassin who is dying of some unnamed disease, but is able to find the energy to murder his victims for no reason included in the film. By the end, where we were invited to accept the police turning a blind eye to Ben killing people himself because he had decent intentions, and the whole conspiracy never needing to have happened if the two evil characters in cahoots had kept quiet and not deliberately sowed the seeds of their own destruction, and you had one almighty shitefest.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 492 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
  Jamie Nichols
Andrew Pragasam
George White
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
   

 

Last Updated: