HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Leatherface
Grimsby
Caniba
Bedroom, The
Dark Tower, The
Better Watch Out
Beguiled, The
Year of the Comet
Levelling, The
Dog Days
Annabelle Creation
Once Upon a Time in Shanghai
Sssssss
Woman in Question, The
Atomic Blonde
Doulos, Le
Okja
Bob le Flambeur
Wedding in White
Léon Morin, Priest
Napping Princess, The
Scorpions and Miniskirts
Berlin File, The
Beaches of Agnès, The
Blue Jeans
Garokawa - Restore the World
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
Gleaners & I, The
Peter of Placid Forest
Golden Bird, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
The Melville Mood: His Final Two Films on The Melville Collection Blu-ray
Always Agnès: 3 from The Varda Collection Blu-ray
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
Two Sides of Sellers: The Party vs The Optimists
Norse Code: The Vikings vs The Long Ships
Over the Moon - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 2
   
 
  Bruce Lee: The Lost Interviews Bruce AlmightyBuy this film here.
Year: 2004
Director: N/A
Stars: Bruce Lee, Pierre Burton, William Cheung
Genre: Documentary, Martial Arts
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: It seems that every possible frame of Bruce Lee footage has been released over the years, to the extent that entire movies have been constructed around out-takes (most notably Game of Death). Bruce Lee: The Lost Interviews is a bit of a misnomer because only one of the three interviews featured could be considered ‘lost’; nevertheless, it provides an interesting insight into the legendary star.

The central interview is the unedited 25-minute black and white Q&A that Lee did on December 9th 1971 for the Pierre Burton Show. Burton was a Canadian author/journalist, and he proves an affable interviewer, even though you’re left with the impression that he doesn’t actually know that much about Lee. Bruce himself is as charismatic as you’d expect, relaxed and friendly if slightly guarded about his future plans. This was an fascinating time for Lee – The Big Boss had made him a superstar in his native Hong Kong, but in the US he was still best known for his TV work than his films. All that would have changed within two years of course, as his death and the posthumously released Enter the Dragon elevated him to world-wide iconic status, but in late ’71 his focus was clearly on breaking the American market through TV. Burton asks him about a show called The Warrior which Lee was scheduled to appear in but Lee is all too aware of the difficulties that a Chinese star faced in winning the lead in a Western show. "It's a risk, and I don't blame them. In the same way, it's like in Hong Kong, if a foreigner came and became a star, if I were the man with the money, I probably would have my own worry of whether or not the acceptance would be there." Lee was right of course; The Warrior was never made, and another show that he was mooted to star in – Kung Fu – became a massive hit with David Carradine in the lead role.

Much of the interview revolves around Lee’s martial arts, both his own philosophy and personal fighting style and the training he provided for a variety of Hollywood stars. Burton seems far more interested in the latter than the former – he frequently mentions the likes of Steve McQueen, James Coburn and James Garner, and at one point even asks Lee who the best fighter was amongst his famous pupils. Nevertheless, Lee is clearly unimpressed by the nature of celebrity: "The word superstar really turns me off, and I'll tell you why. The word ‘star’ man; it's an illusion. It’s something what the public calls you. You should look upon oneself as an actor."

The rest of the DVD is less essential, and fans may have seen/heard much of it before. There are two further interviews with Lee, both conducted for radio, and although Bruce remains as engaging as ever, they reveal nothing about the man that’s not in the Burton programme; indeed some of the answers are repeated word-for-word. There’s also Lee’s 1964 screen test for The Green Hornet. The disc is completed by a new 60 minute interview and profile of William Cheung, a ‘grand master’ of Wing Chung, the style of kung fu in which Lee specialised. This may be for hardcore fans only, but Cheung proves a likeable and interesting man who speaks eloquently about his friendship with Lee and the time they spent training together.

At the end of the day, 25 minutes of new Bruce Lee footage hardly warrants a £17.99 price tag, and casual fans will probably just stick to the great man’s movies. But there’s an undeniable thrill in seeing such a magnetic, iconic figure chat in relaxed surroundings, and a sad reminder of what an amazing talent was lost so soon afterwards.
Reviewer: Daniel Auty

 

This review has been viewed 7204 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
Keith Rockmael
Paul Shrimpton
Ian Phillips
Jensen Breck
   

 

Last Updated: