Newest Reviews
Happy Death Day
You Can't Stop the Murders
Legend of the Mountain
Man: The Polluter
Wolf Warrior II
Journey to the Seventh Planet
Ghost Story, A
Lady in the Lake
Devil at Your Heels, The
Paddington 2
Two Jakes, The
Re: Born
Dracula Sucks
Perfect Weapon, The
Hollywood Babylon
True Legend
Die Laughing
Thor Ragnarok
Killing of a Sacred Deer, The
This Beautiful Fantastic
Monocle, The
Substitute, The
Hallucination Strip
Birth of the Dragon
Revenge of the Pink Panther
Newest Articles
Stop That, It's Silly: The Ends of Monty Python
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
Apocalypse 80s UK: Threads and When the Wind Blows
Movie Flop to Triumphant TV Revival: Twin Peaks and The League of Gentlemen
Driving Force: The Golden Age of American Car Chases
Madness in his Method: Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman
  Android The Man MachineBuy this film here.
Year: 1982
Director: Aaron Lipstadt
Stars: Klaus Kinski, Don Keith Opper, Brie Howard, Norbert Weisser, Crofton Hardester, Kendra Kirchner
Genre: Science Fiction
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Dr Daniel (Klaus Kinski) lives on an isolated space station with his android Max (Don Keith Opper), attempting to create the perfect android woman. Then their peace is interrupted by a gang of three fugitives...

Roger Corman's New World company brought out a few science fiction movies, the best one probably being Battle Beyond the Stars, and the worst ones probably being the films that re-used footage from Battle Beyond the Stars. Android is one of the better efforts, both economical and amusing.

In 1982, there were two American science fiction films that pondered how much like a human an android had to be before it was considered human itself; one was Blade Runner, and this was the other one. Android has an ambiguous approach towards its robots: it likes the technology and it likes Max, but it shows the androids developing human characteristics to treacherous, even deadly, effect.

As the no-good humans are shown to have redeeming features, the androids have their dark side. Max is lonely and looking for love, but on the other hand he shoots down a spaceship that threatens his supposed happiness with one of the fugitives (Brie Howard).

Klaus Kinski was born to play mad scientists, and a few more scenes with him wouldn't have gone amiss. There's a nice bit where Max plays James Brown's "It's a Man's, Man's, Man's World" while wistfully watching clips from Metropolis. Also with: some stop motion animation at the start, and a surprise ending.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark


This review has been viewed 5598 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

Review Comments (0)

Untitled 1

Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Jason Cook
Paul Shrimpton
  Jony Clark
Darren Jones
  The Elix
Paul Smith


Last Updated: