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Interview with filmmakers of Charlie Victor Romeo at 2013 Sundance Film Festival

  Part of the excitement of Sundance involves experimental films where the filmmakers create audacious and bold experiences. Such can be said for the documentary Charlie Victor Romeo in which the filmmakers create a series of six distressed airline scenes based on original black box recordings.

Co-editor Karlyn Berger and co-writer/producer Patrick Daniels took a few minutes out the cockpit to talk about the 2013 Sundance Film Festival entry Charlie Victor Romeo.

Q - What would you suggest to a frequent flyer who sees your film?

A - Karlyn – You are going to learn how incredible the people who are on the flight deck of your airplane, how professional, how hard they work, the level of training they have, how dedicated they would be should the possibility which is very, very low or that should ever a problem arise that they know what they are doing and they are going to do their darndest to get that plane safely on the ground.

Q - Why did you make this film? Is it to scare the bejesus out of us?

A – Patrick – That’s a part of it. It’s not like hey let's think of the craziest, scariest thing. What important to me personally is stuff that’s immediate, intense and communicative. The scaring part isn’t the operative part; it’s a function of these other things. And I think that people deal with their fear all of the time. When you can discuss fear and work with it and use it in yourself then everybody understands it automatically.

Q - If you had a bigger budget what would you have done differently?

A – Patrick – Regardless of the budget if we could do it over again we would make it differently. In my heart of hearts I would have liked to show the locations where the incidents happened.

Q - How does this film compare to airline crash movies such as “'Flight”, “Airport 75” and “Airplane”?

A – Patrick – One of the great things about “Airplane” is that the content is what it is. It is a wonderful film. They bring you into the cockpit in a way that you don’t expect and that’s cool. It’s a mechanism for the comedy but the view is an odd point of view. It’s really interesting where they place the camera. It’s not about the flying, it’s about the people who are in there. The difference isn’t anything but the fact that those various airline crash movies are fiction to whatever degree while ours is based on transcript. This is real human experience.
Author: Keith Rockmael


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